Overview

Distribution

South America: Amazon and Tocantins River basins. Also known from Guyana.
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Amazon River basin and Tocantins River basin: Brazil and Guyana.
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Physical Description

Size

Maximum size: 150 mm ---
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Max. size

7.5 cm SL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 38376))
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Ecology

Habitat

Environment

pelagic; freshwater; pH range: 5.5 - 7.5; dH range: 0 - 20
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Trophic Strategy

Scale-eating behavior was suggested to originate from intra- and interspecific aggressive behavior and opportunistic foraging on various substrates.
  • Sazima, I. 1983 Scale-eating in characoids and other fishes. Environ. Biol. Fish. 9(2):87-101. (Ref. 28733)
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Exodon paradoxus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Threats

Not Evaluated
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

aquarium: commercial
  • Robins, C.R., R.M. Bailey, C.E. Bond, J.R. Brooker, E.A. Lachner, R.N. Lea and W.B. Scott 1991 World fishes important to North Americans. Exclusive of species from the continental waters of the United States and Canada. Am. Fish. Soc. Spec. Publ. (21):243 p. (Ref. 4537)
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Wikipedia

Bucktooth tetra

The bucktooth tetra (Exodon paradoxus) is the only member of the genus Exodon and is a freshwater fish of the characin family (family Characidae) of order Characiformes. It is native to the Amazon Basin and Guyana. Though first described in 1845, it was not imported and distributed by the aquarium trade until 1932.

This species is of typical elongated tetra appearance; it is light tan in appearance with two distinct black spots (one before the tail and another below the dorsal fin). The dorsal fin is bright red. The name is quite contradictory of the actual fish however, with Bucktooth tetras showing no signs of actual teeth. It grows to a maximum overall length of approximately 12 cm (4.7 in).

The fish's natural diet consist of small invertebrates, other fish, and plants. It is not a safe tank mate for fellow tetras because it will eat small fish and it is not a safe tank mate for larger species because it is a notorious lepidophage. Bucktooth tetra are best alone or in large planted tanks with adequate coverage for other species. They are best kept in shoals of 8 or more; a shoal that is less than 8 will pick at each other and stress the exodons to a point where it will catch some disease or will die of severe wounds. It is otherwise extremely hardy and can live in home aquaria for more than ten years.

See also[edit]

References[edit]


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