Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Adults inhabit shallow reefs, both in lagoons and outer reef areas. They frequently move in groups. Juveniles found between soft corals in lagoons at depths of up to 2 m (Ref. 9710, 48637). Adults in groups, often mixed with other similar species (Ref. 48637).
  • Randall, J.E. 1956 A revision of the surgeonfish genus Acanthurus. Pac. Sci. 10(2):159-235. (Ref. 1920)
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Distribution

Range Description

Acanthurus auranticavus is found from the Philippines, Indonesia, Great Barrier Reef, Australia, Maldives and Seychelles (Randall 2001a). It was reported from Ashmore, Scott and Rowley Shoals (J.H. Choat pers. comm. 2010), Malaysia (Mohsin et al. 1993), Samoa (Wass 1984), western Solomon Islands (Aswani and Lauer 2006) and Papua New Guinea (Allen et al. 2003). It was recently recorded from Christmas Island (J.H. Choat pers. comm. 2010). Records from Samoa and Viet Nam need to be verified (K.D. Clements pers. comm. 2010).
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Western Indian Ocean: Mozambique (Ref. 41878). Indo-West Pacific: Seychelles (Ref. 10685), Philippines, Indonesia and Great Barrier Reef; recently found in Maldives. Reported from Malaysia (Ref. 5756) and Samoa (Ref. 592).
  • Randall, J.E., G.R. Allen and R.C. Steene 1990 Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, Hawaii. 506 p. (Ref. 2334)
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Indo-West Pacific.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 25 - 26; Analspines: 3; Analsoft rays: 23 - 24
  • Randall, J.E. 1956 A revision of the surgeonfish genus Acanthurus. Pac. Sci. 10(2):159-235. (Ref. 1920)
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Size

Max. size

45.0 cm SL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 48637)); max. reported age: 30 years (Ref. 52229)
  • Choat, J.H. and D.R. Robertson 2002 Age-based studies on coral reef fishes. p. 57-80. In P.F. Sale (ed.) Coral reef fishes: dynamics and diversity in a complex ecosystem. Academic Press. (Ref. 52229)
  • Kuiter, R.H. and T. Tonozuka 2001 Pictorial guide to Indonesian reef fishes. Part 3. Jawfishes - Sunfishes, Opistognathidae - Molidae. Zoonetics, Australia. p. 623-893. (Ref. 48637)
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Maximum size: 350 mm TL
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Diagnostic Description

Color in life dark brown; orange brown from pectoral base downward; caudal spine socket bright orange; orange blotch before and behind pupil; caudal fin base with a white band. Anterior gill rakers 20-23, posterior 24-28. Large caudal spine, 2.2 - 4.4 in head.
  • Randall, J.E. 1956 A revision of the surgeonfish genus Acanthurus. Pac. Sci. 10(2):159-235. (Ref. 1920)
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Type Information

Paratype for Acanthurus auranticavus
Catalog Number: USNM 163823
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Year Collected: 1908
Locality: Mansalay Bay (Northeast, shore, reef), Mansalay; Off Southeastern Mindoro, Mindoro, Mindoro Oriental, Philippines, Philippine Archipelago, Mansalay Bay, Pacific
Depth (m): 2 to 5
Vessel: Albatross
  • Paratype:
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Paratype for Acanthurus auranticavus
Catalog Number: USNM 163619
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Year Collected: 1909
Locality: East Coast of Luzon, San Bernardino Strait To San Miguel Bay; Lagonoy Gulf, Atulayan Island (East), Atulayan Island, Philippines, Philippine Archipelago, Lagonoy Gulf, Philippine Sea, Pacific
Depth (m): 2 to 3
Vessel: Albatross
  • Paratype:
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Paratype for Acanthurus auranticavus
Catalog Number: USNM 136202
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Year Collected: 1909
Locality: Vicinity of Darvel Bay, Borneo: Danawan Island, Dyn., Si Amil Island, Borneo, Sabah, Malaysia, Pacific
Depth (m): 2 to 6
Vessel: Albatross
  • Paratype:
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Holotype for Acanthurus auranticavus
Catalog Number: USNM 136194
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Year Collected: 1909
Locality: East Coast of Luzon, San Bernardino Strait To San Miguel Bay; Lagonoy Gulf, Atulayan Island (East), Atulayan Island, Philippines, Philippine Archipelago, Lagonoy Gulf, Philippine Sea, Pacific
Depth (m): 2 to 3
Vessel: Albatross
  • Holotype:
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Acanthurus auranticavus inhabits shallow reefs, both in lagoons and outer reef areas. It is generally associated with hard substrata (K.D. Clements pers. comm. 2010). It is often encountered in feeding aggregations, sometimes consisting of more than 30 individuals (Randall 2001a). It was recorded as a major resident species on shallow inner lagoon reefs, mid-depth inner lagoon reef and lagoon pool and reef channel in the Baraulu MPA, Western Solomon Islands (Aswani and Lauer 2006). A. auranticavus feeds on detritus and sedimentary material (Choat et al. 2004). Maximum age is 30 years (Choat and Robertson 2002). It is classified as a grazer/detritivore (Choat and Bellwood pers. obs. in Green and Bellwood 2009).

The sexes are separate among the acanthurids (Reeson 1983). Acanthurids do not display obvious sexual dimorphism, males assume courtship colours (J.H. Choat pers. comm. 2010).
.

Systems
  • Marine
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Environment

reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 20 m (Ref. 90102)
  • Allen, G.R. and M.V. Erdmann 2012 Reef fishes of the East Indies. Perth, Australia: Universitiy of Hawai'i Press, Volumes I-III. Tropical Reef Research. (Ref. 90102)
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Depth range based on 51 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 45 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1 - 57
  Temperature range (°C): 25.082 - 28.575
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.296 - 1.522
  Salinity (PPS): 34.228 - 35.321
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.406 - 4.705
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.123 - 0.254
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.567 - 4.599

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 1 - 57

Temperature range (°C): 25.082 - 28.575

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.296 - 1.522

Salinity (PPS): 34.228 - 35.321

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.406 - 4.705

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.123 - 0.254

Silicate (umol/l): 0.567 - 4.599
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Acanthurus auranticavus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Russell, B., Nanola, C., Choat, J.H., Stockwell, B., McIlwain, J., Clements, K.D., Rocha, L.A., Abesamis, R. & Myers, R.

Reviewer/s
Davidson, L., Edgar, G. & Kulbicki, M.

Contributor/s

Justification
Acanthurus auranticavus is widespread and generally uncommon. It is captured for food but is not targeted in most of its range. There are no major threats known for this species and it occurs in a number of marine protected areas in parts of its distribution. It is therefore listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
Acanthurus albipectoralis has been recorded as abundant in deep stations at the Nha Trang Bay Marine Protected Area (MPA) (Nguyen and Phan 2008). This deep water record from Viet Nam is doubtful on the basis that this species has only been observed on reef flats and reef crests in other parts of its range (i.e., Great Barrier Reef) and similar species (A. blochii, A. grammoptilus and A. xanthopterus) have not been observed during the Viet Nam survey (K.D. Clements pers. comm. 2010). Visual census surveys along Aceh coast, Indonesia, recorded fish densities of 4 individuals/750 m2 at Teluk Pelabuhan (FMIPA 2007).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats known for this species.

Surgeonfishes show varying degrees of habitat preference and utilization of coral reef habitats, with some species spending the majority of their life stages on coral reef while others primarily utilize seagrass beds, mangroves, algal beds, and /or rocky reefs. The majority of surgeonfishes are exclusively found on coral reef habitat, and of these, approximately 80% are experiencing a greater than 30% loss of coral reef area and degradation of coral reef habitat quality across their distributions. However, more research is needed to understand the long-term effects of coral reef habitat loss and degradation on these species' populations. Widespread coral reef loss and declining habitat conditions are particularly worrying for species that recruit into areas with live coral cover, especially as studies have shown that protection of pristine habitats facilitate the persistence of adult populations in species that have spatially separated adult and juvenile habitats (Comeros-Raynal et al. 2012).
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Least Concern (LC)
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no species-specific conservation measures in place for this species. Its distribution overlaps several marine protected areas in parts of its range.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: commercial
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Wikipedia

Acanthurus auranticavus

Acanthurus auranticavus, is a tropical fish with the common names Orange-socket surgeonfish and Ring-tail surgeon. It was named by Randall in 1956.[1]

Description

Acanthurus auranticavus live in schools which often include other types of fish.[2] The species is distributed in coral reefs in the western-Indian Ocean, as well as the western Pacific, and the Great Barrier Reef.[2]

References

  1. ^ Page 24, Surgeonfishes of the world, by John E. Randall. Mutual Pub., 2001. ISBN 1-56647-561-9/ISBN 978-1-56647-561-7
  2. ^ a b Acanthurus auranticavus at www.fishbase.org.
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