Articles on this page are available in 2 other languages: Spanish (1), Chinese (Simplified) (4) (learn more)

Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

An oceanic, epipelagic species frequently solitary or forming small loose aggregations rather than compact schools. Feed on fishes and squids. Eggs and larvae are pelagic (Ref. 6769). An important sport fish in some areas (Ref. 9340). Marketed fresh, salted or spice-cured slices of meat; also frozen (Ref. 9987). Flesh of very good quality (Ref. 9684).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 1 person

Average rating: 4.0 of 5

Description

  Common names: wahoo (English), guajúes (Espanol), peto (Espanol), sierra (Espanol)
 
Acanthocybium solandri (Cuvier in Cuvier & Valenciennes, 1832)


Wahoo


Very elongate, fusiform, slightly compressed; snout long (50% head length), pointed; rear of top jaw bone hidden; teeth strong, compressed, triangular; no gill rakers; 1st  dorsal fin with long base, XXIII-XXVII spines; 2nd  dorsal 12-16, with 8-9 finlets behind anal fin 12-14 + 9 finlets behind; 1 lateral line; corselet of scales indistinct; 1 large + 2 small keels on tail base.


Iridescent bluish green on back;  sides silvery with 24-30 cobalt-blue bars, some doubled or "Y"-shaped.


Size: reaches 250 cm; all- tackle world record 83.5 Kg.

Inhabits oceanic waters, generally well offshore.

Depth: 0-15 m.

All tropical seas; northern Baja to the mouth of the Gulf of California to Peru and all the oceanic islands.
   
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Shorefishes of the tropical eastern Pacific online information system. www.stri.org/sftep

Source: Shorefishes of the Tropical Eastern Pacific Online Information System

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Atlantic, Indian and Pacific: in tropical and subtropical waters, including the Caribbean and Mediterranean seas; as far north as 44°N in Canadian Atlantic
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Range Description

This species is present in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans in tropical and subtropical waters, including the Caribbean and Mediterranean seas. In the Eastern Pacific, it occurs from northern Baja at least to Loretto in the Gulf of California, south to northern Peru, including all of the oceanic islands. In the southern Atlantic, this species has been found as far south as 45°S.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Zoogeography

See Map (including site records) of Distribution in the Tropical Eastern Pacific 
 
Global Endemism: All species, TEP non-endemic, Circumtropical ( Indian + Pacific + Atlantic Oceans), "Transpacific" (East + Central &/or West Pacific), All Pacific (West + Central + East), East Pacific + Atlantic (East +/or West), Transisthmian (East Pacific + Atlantic of Central America), East Pacific + all Atlantic (East+West)

Regional Endemism: All species, Eastern Pacific non-endemic, Tropical Eastern Pacific (TEP) non-endemic, Continent + Island (s), Continent, Island (s)

Residency: Resident

Climate Zone: Northern Subtropical (Cortez Province + Sinaloan Gap), Northern Tropical (Mexican Province to Nicaragua + Revillagigedos), Equatorial (Costa Rica to Ecuador + Galapagos, Clipperton, Cocos, Malpelo), South Temperate (Peruvian Province )
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Shorefishes of the tropical eastern Pacific online information system. www.stri.org/sftep

Source: Shorefishes of the Tropical Eastern Pacific Online Information System

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans: in tropical and subtropical waters, including the Caribbean and Mediterranean seas.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Almost circumglobal in tropical through warm temperate seas, including Madagascar, Mascarenes, Hawaiian Islands, straying to Mediterranean Sea.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© FishWise Professional

Source: FishWise Professional

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Depth

Depth Range (m): 0 (S) - 15 (S)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Shorefishes of the tropical eastern Pacific online information system. www.stri.org/sftep

Source: Shorefishes of the Tropical Eastern Pacific Online Information System

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 23 - 27; Dorsal soft rays (total): 12 - 16; Analspines: 0; Analsoft rays: 12 - 14; Vertebrae: 62 - 64
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Size

Length max (cm): 250.0 (S)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Shorefishes of the tropical eastern Pacific online information system. www.stri.org/sftep

Source: Shorefishes of the Tropical Eastern Pacific Online Information System

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Size

Maximum size: 2500 mm TL
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© FishWise Professional

Source: FishWise Professional

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Max. size

250 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 30573)); max. published weight: 83.0 kg (Ref. 168)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Description

An oceanic species frequently solitary or forming small loose aggregations rather than compact schools. Feeds on scombrids, porcupinefishes, flyingfishes, herrings and pilchards, scads, lanternfishes, other pelagic fishes and squids. Each mature female may release 6 million eggs per spawning season (Ref. 9340). An important sport fish in some areas and caught with troll lines, artificial lures, or live bait (Ref. 9340). Marketed fresh, salted or spice-cured (slices of meat); also frozen (Ref. 9987). Flesh of very good quality (Ref. 9684).
  • Anon. (1996). FishBase 96 [CD-ROM]. ICLARM: Los Baños, Philippines. 1 cd-rom pp.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Mouth large with strong, triangular, compressed and finely serrate teeth. Snout about as long as the rest of head. Posterior part of maxilla completely concealed under preorbital bone. Gill rakers absent. Interpelvic process small and bifid. Swim bladder present. Body covered with small scales. No anterior corselet developed. The back is iridescent bluish green; the sides silvery with 24 to 30 cobalt blue vertical bars which extend to below the lateral line.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Known from seamounts and knolls
  • Stocks, K. 2009. Seamounts Online: an online information system for seamount biology. Version 2009-1. World Wide Web electronic publication.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

nektonic
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

An oceanic, epipelagic species frequently solitary or forming small loose aggregations rather than compact schools.
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This is an oceanic, epipelagic species frequently found solitarily or forming small, loose aggregations rather than compact schools. It is found to at least 340 m (Nobrega et al. 2009). It feeds on fishes and squids. This species feeds on cephalopods around São Pedro and São Paulo Archipelago (Andrade et al. 2007), where the Flying Fish Cypselurus cyanopterus is also an important food item, together with other fishes, such as Oxyporhamphus micropterus and Dactylopterus volitans (Vaske-Junior et al. 2003).

Its spawning season in Gulf of Mexico, Bahamas and Bermuda is from at least May–October (Oxenford et al. 2003). In St. Peter and St. Paul's rocks spawning occurs in April and May. Individuals caught in this region are primarily adults that are gathering to spawn (Melo et al. 2011). Females are multiple batch spawners and are highly fecund. An individual female might spawn every 2–6 days, a total of 20–62 times during a spawning season. The mean batch fecundity in the northern Gulf of Mexico is 1.1 million eggs resulting in a total annual fecundity of 30–92.8 million eggs (Brown-Peterson et al. 2000). Batch fecundity for Florida and the Bahamas ranged from 0.8–1.7 million eggs (Jenkins and McBride 2009). Fish in different maturity stages are frequently caught at the same time. This is a fast growing species with high mortality.

This species exhibits early sexual maturity, usually within the first year. Generation length is estimated to be between 3–5 years (Collette et al. 2011). Average reproductive age is one year for females and two years for males. The species lives on average for 5–6 years (Oxenford et al. 2003), but can live as long as nine years (McBride et al. 2008, Melo et al. 2011). In the northern Gulf of Mexico, 50% sexual maturity in males is reached before 93.5 cm fork length (FL), probably at an age of one year. In females, size at 50% maturity is approximately 102 cm FL, at an estimated age of two years (Brown-Peterson et al. 2000). For the Bahamas and Florida, 50% female maturity at 92.5 cm (FL) at 0.6 years of age (Mackie Jenkins and McBride 2009). In St. Peter and St. Paul's the first sexual maturity for males was at 101 cm and at 110 cm for females, which corresponds to an age of approximately 3.8 years (Melo et al. 2011).

The maximum recorded length is 200 cm in Cape Hatteras, US (Hogarth 1976) and the maximum weight recorded is 84.5 kg (IGFA 2011).

Systems
  • Marine
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Environment

pelagic-oceanic; oceanodromous (Ref. 51243); marine; depth range 0 - 12 m (Ref. 5227), usually 0 - ? m
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Depth range based on 24851 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 24123 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 50000
  Temperature range (°C): 1.478 - 28.954
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.036 - 32.106
  Salinity (PPS): 32.419 - 37.166
  Oxygen (ml/l): 2.556 - 6.979
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.025 - 2.072
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.535 - 80.155

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 50000

Temperature range (°C): 1.478 - 28.954

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.036 - 32.106

Salinity (PPS): 32.419 - 37.166

Oxygen (ml/l): 2.556 - 6.979

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.025 - 2.072

Silicate (umol/l): 0.535 - 80.155
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Depth: 0 - 12m.
Recorded at 12 meters.

Habitat: pelagic. Wahoo.  (Cuvier, 1832) Attains 210 cm. and 83 Kg. Rare in our area. Taken by anglers in Algoa Bay, Durban and Sodwana Bay. Iridescent blue-green on back; sides silvery with 24-30 cobalt blue bars some doubled or Y-shaped. A worldwide species of tropical and subtropical waters in all 3 major oceans and the Mediterranean Sea.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© FishWise Professional

Source: FishWise Professional

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Salinity: Marine, Marine Only

Inshore/Offshore: Offshore, In & Offshore, Inshore

Water Column Position: Surface, Near Surface, Mid Water, Water column only

Habitat: Water column

FishBase Habitat: Pelagic
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Shorefishes of the tropical eastern Pacific online information system. www.stri.org/sftep

Source: Shorefishes of the Tropical Eastern Pacific Online Information System

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Migration

Oceanodromous. Migrating within oceans typically between spawning and different feeding areas, as tunas do. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Trophic Strategy

Frequently solitary or forming small loose aggregations rather than compact schools. An oceanic, epipelagic species frequently solitary or forming small loose aggregations rather than compact schools. Feed on fishes and squids.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Partner Web Site: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Feeding

Feeding Group: Carnivore

Diet: octopus/squid/cuttlefish, bony fishes
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Shorefishes of the tropical eastern Pacific online information system. www.stri.org/sftep

Source: Shorefishes of the Tropical Eastern Pacific Online Information System

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Diet

Feeds on fishes and squids
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life Cycle

Spawning seems to extend over a long period; fish in different maturity stages are frequently caught at the same time.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Reproduction

Egg Type: Pelagic, Pelagic larva
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Shorefishes of the tropical eastern Pacific online information system. www.stri.org/sftep

Source: Shorefishes of the Tropical Eastern Pacific Online Information System

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Acanthocybium solandri

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 37 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

TTCGTAATAATTTTCTTTATAGTAATGCCAATTATGATTGGAGGTTTCGGAAACTGACTCATCCCTCTAATG---ATTGGAGCCCCAGACATAGCATTCCCCCGAATAAACAACATGAGCTTCTGACTCTTACCTCCTTCATTCCTTCTGCTCCTAGCCTCTTCTGGGGTCGAAGCTGGTGCCGGAACTGGATGAACAGTATACCCCCCTCTCGCCGGTAACCTAGCCCACGCTGGAGCGTCAGTTGACTTA---ACCATTTTCTCCCTGCACTTAGCAGGTGTTTCCTCAATCCTCGGGGCAATTAACTTCATTACAACAATTATTAATATGAAACCCGCAGCTATTTCTCAGTACCAGACGCCCCTATTTGTATGAGCCGTGCTAATTACTGCCGTTCTACTTCTACTTTCACTACCAGTCCTTGCCGCC---GGCATTACAATGCTTCTTACGGACCGAAACCTAAATACAACCTTTTTCGACCCCGCAGGAGGAGGTGACCCAATCCTTTACCAACACCTATTCTGATTCTTTGGCCACCCCGAAGTATATATTCTTATTCTCCCAGGATTTGGAATAATTTCTCATATTGTCGCCTACTATTCAGGCAAAAAA---GAACCTTTCGGTTATATGGGTATGGTATGAGCCATGATGGCTATCGGCCTACTAGGGTTCATCGTATGAGCCCACCACATGTTTACAGTAGGAATAGACGTAGACACACGAGCCTACTTTACATCCGCAACAATGATTATCGCAATTCCAACGGGTGTTAAAGTCTTCAGCTGACTC---GCAACCCTTCACGGAGGT---GCTGTTAAATGAGAAACCCCTCTCCTATGGGCCATCGGCTTTATTTTCCTCTTCACAGTTGGAGGGCTAACAGGCATTGTCCTAGCCAATTCATCTCTAGACATTGTTCTCCACGACACGTACTACGTTGTAGCCCACTTCCACTATGTC---CTATCCATGGGAGCCGTCTTCGCCATC------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------GTT
-- end --

Download FASTA File

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Acanthocybium solandri

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 40
Specimens with Barcodes: 63
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2011

Assessor/s
Collette, B., Acero, A., Amorim, A.F., Boustany, A., Canales Ramirez, C., Cardenas, G., Carpenter, K.E., de Oliveira Leite Jr., N., Di Natale, A., Die, D., Fox, W., Fredou, F.L., Graves, J., Guzman-Mora, A., Viera Hazin, F.H., Hinton, M., Juan Jorda, M., Kada, O., Minte Vera, C., Miyabe, N., Montano Cruz, R., Nelson, R., Oxenford, H., Restrepo, V., Salas, E., Schaefer, K., Schratwieser, J., Serra, R., Sun, C., Teixeira Lessa, R.P., Pires Ferreira Travassos, P.E., Uozumi, Y. & Yanez, E.

Reviewer/s
Russell, B. & Polidoro, B.

Contributor/s

Justification
Tropical Eastern Pacific Assessment
This species is widespread and oceanic, there are no targeted commercial fisheries although it is captured as bycatch in trolling and longline fisheries. It is commonly eaten and sold nationally. It is an important sports fish. There is no information available on the population and how the bycatch affects the population. However, catch has been increasing over the last 15 years. Research should be carried out to assess the effects. It is listed as Least Concern.

Mediterranean Assessment
In the Mediterranean this species is only sporadically caught and catches appear to be increasing slightly. It is listed as Least Concern.

Atlantic Assessment
Given that this species is fast growing and early maturing, there is no current evidence of it being significantly impacted by current fishing effort, although local depletions may have occurred. It is listed as Least Concern.

Global Assessment
This is a widespread species, with recent genetic evidence indicating that it has high genetic connectivity globally. FAO fisheries statistics suggest increasing landings over the past 20 years. Given that this species is fast growing and early maturing, there is no current evidence of it being significantly impacted by current fishing effort, although local depletions may have occurred. It is listed as Least Concern.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

IUCN Red List: Not evaluated / Listed

CITES: Not listed
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Shorefishes of the tropical eastern Pacific online information system. www.stri.org/sftep

Source: Shorefishes of the Tropical Eastern Pacific Online Information System

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
The population is estimated to be relatively stable, primarily due to their rapid growth rate and reproductive potential. Reported worldwide catches show a gradual increase from 100 t in 1960, to 3,392 t in 2006 (FAO 2009). It is possible that this increase may represent an improvement in documentation and/or increase in fishing effort.

Atlantic
Estimated catches in the Atlantic and Caribbean between 1983 and 2007 are variable and range between a peak of 3,085 mt in 1997 and a low of 920 mt in 1985 (ICCAT 2009). It is important to note that variability in catches might be more related to reporting rate than to actual fluctuations in the population (Hazin pers. comm. 2010). There is a pronounced seasonal abundance of this species at least in the Western Atlantic (SAFMC 2003).

The most recent stock assessment for the eastern Caribbean (CRFM 2007) concluded that there was no decline in the catch rate, but that the data were insufficient. The mean catch rates between 1996 and 2006 fluctuated between 20–25 kg/trip without a clear trend. Catch per unit effort (CPUE) data were used from only two countries, Barbados and St. Lucia. The recommendation was that there should be a precautionary approach to the development of the fishery (CRFM 2007). The status of Wahoo resources in the western central Atlantic remains unclear.

Between 1990 and 2009, the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico recreational landings fluctuated between 22,000 and 110,000 fish/year without discernible trend (R. Nelson pers. comm. from NMFS Fisheries Statistics Division 2010). During the same time period, reported U.S. commercial landings peaked at 165 mt in 1993 and then steadily declined to 61 mt in 2008 (R. Nelson pers. comm. from NMFS Fisheries Statistics Division 2010).

Mediterranean
Catches of this species are generally not reported in the Mediterranean, as this species is not a typical resident and occurs only sporadically.

Eastern Tropical Pacific
Landing data from the Eastern Tropical Pacific region show recent increases in landings (FAO 2009). There are no data to suggest that the increase in landings is negatively affecting the population.

Indian Ocean
Only minimal catches are reported for the Indian Ocean (IOTC 2007).

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
There do not appear to be any organized fisheries for this species in most areas (Collette and Nauen 1983), but this species is targeted in the western Atlantic by both commercial and recreational fisheries, where landings are most certainly under reported for this species (Oxenford et al. 2003). This species is typically caught by trolling, hook and line and as a bycatch in purse-seine and longline fisheries (Collette 1995).

In the Eastern Pacific, this species is often caught as bycatch in purse seines, especially given the increased effort using Fish Aggregating Devices (FADS). No stock assessment has been carried out. In the Atlantic, small tunas are exploited mainly by coastal fisheries and often by artisanal fisheries, although substantial catches are also made, either as target species or as bycatch, by purse seiners, mid-water trawlers, handlines, troll lines, driftnets, surface drifting long-lines and small scale gillnets. Several recreational fisheries also target small tunas. In the southwest Atlantic this species is caught by artisanal handline and trolling in the northeast and central Brazil, as bycatch in industrial longliners and game fisheries (Nobrega et al. 2009, Amorim and Silva 2005).

Increasing using of FADs, both fixed and those used in the tropical tuna purse seine fishery, has increased the directed and bycatch mortality of Wahoo throughout its range. However, there is a general lack of information on the mortality of these species as bycatch, exacerbated by the confusion regarding species identification (ICCAT 2009).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Least Concern (LC)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species' distribution includes a number of Marine Protected Areas. There are limited species-specific conservation measures in place for this species. In the US Atlantic, the harvest of this species is restricted to hook and line gear (SAFMC 2003). Area wide annual closures of 62 days exist for this species in the Eastern Pacific, and there is also a FAD closure in the western and central Pacific for two months a year (WCPFC 2009).

The status of Wahoo resources in the western central Atlantic remains unclear. Reliable Wahoo catch and fishing effort data from this area, improved knowledge of migration patterns, reproductive characteristics and critical habitat, validation of age, growth and mortality estimates, and a more comprehensive analysis of stock structure for the entire Atlantic are needed for informed Wahoo stock assessment and management (Oxenford et al. 2003).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: commercial; gamefish: yes
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Wahoo

Wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri) is a scombrid fish found worldwide in tropical and subtropical seas. It is best known to sports fishermen, as its speed and high-quality flesh make it a prize game fish. In Hawaii, the wahoo is known as ono. Many Hispanic areas of the Caribbean and Central America refer to this fish as peto.

Contents

Description

The body is elongated and covered with small, scarcely visible scales; the back is an iridescent blue, while the sides are silvery, with a pattern of irregular vertical blue bars and have razor sharp teeth. These colors fade rapidly at death. The mouth is large, and both the upper and lower jaws have a somewhat sharper appearance than those of king or Spanish mackerel. Specimens have been recorded at up to 2.5 metres (8 ft 2 in) in length, and weighing up to 83 kilograms (180 lb).[4] Growth can be rapid. One specimen tagged at 5 kilograms (11 lb) grew to 15 kg (33 lb) in one year. Wahoo can swim up to 60 mph (97 km/h).[5] They are some of the fastest fish in the sea.

The wahoo may be distinguished from the related Atlantic king mackerel and from the Indo-Pacific Narrow-barred Spanish mackerel by a fold of skin which covers the mandible when its mouth is closed. In contrast, the mandible of the king mackerel is always visible as is also the case for the smaller Spanish mackerel and Cero mackerel. The teeth of the wahoo are similar to those of king mackerel, but shorter and more closely set together.

The barracuda is sometimes confused with mackerel and wahoo, but is easy to distinguish from the latter two species. Barracuda have prominent scales, larger, dagger-like teeth, and lack the caudal keels and blade-like tail characteristic of the scombrid (mackerel)

Biology

Wahoo tend to be solitary or occur in loose-knit groups of two or three fish, but where conditions are suitable can be found in schools as large as 100 or more. Their diet is made up of other fish and squid.

Most wahoo taken have a trematode parasite living in their stomach, the giant stomach worm (Hirudinella ventricosa), which does not appear to harm the fish.[5][6]

Commercial and sports fisheries

The flesh of the wahoo is white to grey, delicate to dense, and highly regarded by many gourmets. The taste is similar to mackerel, though arguably less pronounced. This has created some demand for the wahoo as a premium priced commercial food fish. In many areas of its range, such as Hawaii, Bermuda and many parts of the Caribbean, local demand for wahoo is met by artisanal commercial fishermen, who take them primarily by trawling, as well as by recreational sports fishermen who sell their catch.

Although local wahoo populations can be affected by heavy commercial and sports fishing pressure, wahoo as a species are less susceptible to industrial commercial fishing than more tightly schooling and abundant species such as tuna. Wahoo are regularly taken as a by-catch in various commercial fisheries, including longline fisheries for tuna, billfish and dolphinfish (a.k.a. mahi-mahi or dorado) and in tuna purse seine fisheries, especially in sets made around floating objects, which act as a focal point for a great deal of other marine life besides tuna. In 2003, the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council issued a Dolphin Wahoo Fishery Management Plan for the Atlantic.[7][8] However, the species as a whole is not considered overfished.[7]

In most parts of its range, the wahoo is a highly prized sport fishing catch. It reaches a good size, is often available not too far from land, and is a very good fighter on light to medium tackle. It is known in sports fishing circles for the speed and strength of its first run. The aggressive habits and razor-sharp teeth of the wahoo can be of considerable annoyance when targeting larger gamefish, however, such as tuna or marlin.

Notes

  1. ^ Collette B and 32 others (2011). "Acanthocybium solandri". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/170331. Retrieved 8 December 2012.
  2. ^ Cuvier G. & Valenciennes A. (January 1832). Histoire naturelle des poissons. Tome huitième. Livre neuvième. Des Scombéroïdes. Historie naturelle des poissons. v. 8: i-xix + 5 pp. + 1-509, Pls. 209-245. [Cuvier authored pp. 1-470; Valenciennes 471-509. Date of 1831 on title page. i-xv + 1-375 in Strasbourg edition.]
  3. ^ "Acanthocybium solandri". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=172451.
  4. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2005). "Acanthocybium solandri" in FishBase. November 2005 version.
  5. ^ a b "Wahoo Fast Facts". Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. http://myfwc.com/research/saltwater/fish/wahoo/facts/. Retrieved June 15, 2012.
  6. ^ Williams, Jr., William H.; Bunkley-Williams, Lucy (1996). "Parasites of Offshore Big Game Fishes of Puerto Rico and the Western Atlantic". University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez. http://www.uprm.edu/biology/cjs/biggamefish.pdf. Retrieved June 15, 2012.
  7. ^ a b "Dolphin/Wahoo". South Atlantic Fishery Management Council. http://www.safmc.net/Library/DolphinWahoo/tabid/410/Default.aspx. Retrieved June 15, 2012.
  8. ^ "Fishery Management Plan for the Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery of the Atlantic". South Atlantic Fishery Management Council. January 2003. http://www.safmc.net/Portals/6/Library/FMP/DolphinWahoo/DolphinWahooFMP.pdf. Retrieved June 15, 2012.

References

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!