Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Range includes Elk, Susquehanna, Bush, Patapsco, Patuxent, Potomac, Nanticoke, James, and Roanoke drainages in Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania (Kinziger et al. 2000). Atlantic Slope drainages from the Elk River, Pennsylvania, to the Roanoke River system, Virginia and North Carolina (Page and Burr 2011). Populations in the Rappahannock (Virginia) seem to represent another taxon, perhaps more closely related to C. girardi (as inferred from an allozyme data set) (Kinziger et al. 2000; Dave Neely, pers. comm., 2000).
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endemic to a single nation

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (20,000-200,000 square km (about 8000-80,000 square miles)) Range includes Elk, Susquehanna, Bush, Patapsco, Patuxent, Potomac, Nanticoke, James, and Roanoke drainages in Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania (Kinziger et al. 2000). Atlantic Slope drainages from the Elk River, Pennsylvania, to the Roanoke River system, Virginia and North Carolina (Page and Burr 2011). Populations in the Rappahannock (Virginia) seem to represent another taxon, perhaps more closely related to C. girardi (as inferred from an allozyme data set) (Kinziger et al. 2000; Dave Neely, pers. comm., 2000).

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Eastern U.S.A.
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North America: Atlantic drainages including the Elk, Susquehanna, Bush, Patapsco, Patuxent, Potomac, Nanticoke, James and Roanoke.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 5 - 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 14 - 19; Analspines: 0; Analsoft rays: 10 - 14
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Size

Max. size

6.3 cm SL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 37399))
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Diagnostic Description

See Kinziger et al. (2000).

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Two-spotted first dorsal fin; chin uniformly pigmented; dossal saddles moderate to wide; incomplete lateral line; preopercular spines slight to moderate, palatine teeth weak to moderate, and postpectoral prickling slight to moderate. Distinguished from C. b. bairdi by caudal base band unnotched in at least one side versus both sides notched. Palatine tooth patch moderately developed.
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Type Information

Paratype for Cottus caeruleomentum Kinziger et al.
Catalog Number: USNM 350113
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Collector(s): A. Kinziger & S. Davis
Year Collected: 1998
Locality: Evitts Creek At I68, E. of Cumberland, Allegany Co., Md, Allegany County, Maryland, United States, North America
  • Paratype: Kinziger, et al. 22 Dec. 2000. Copeia. 2000 (4): 1009, figs 1-2.
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Holotype for Cottus caeruleomentum Kinziger et al.
Catalog Number: USNM 350112
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Collector(s): A. Kinziger & S. Davis
Year Collected: 1998
Locality: Evitts Creek At I68, E. of Cumberland, Allegany Co., Md, Allegany County, Maryland, United States, North America
  • Holotype: Kinziger, et al. 22 Dec. 2000. Copeia. 2000 (4): 1009, figs 1-2.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Habitat includes rocky riffles of headwaters and creeks, and springs (Page and Burr 2011). Habitat on the coastal plain is limited to cold, spring-fed streams (Kinziger et al. 2000).

Systems
  • Freshwater
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Habitat Type: Freshwater

Comments: Habitat includes rocky riffles of headwaters and creeks, and springs (Page and Burr 2011). Habitat on the coastal plain is limited to cold, spring-fed streams (Kinziger et al. 2000).

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Environment

demersal; freshwater
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Migration

Non-Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species do not make significant seasonal migrations. Juvenile dispersal is not considered a migration.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 - 300

Comments: This species is represented by a large number of occurrences (subpopulations).

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Cottus caeruleomentum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 10 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNATAGTAGGCACAGCTTTAAGCCTCCTAATTCGAGCAGAACTAAGCCAACCCGGCGCCCTTTTGGGGGACGACCAGATTTATAATGTAATTGTTACAGCCCATGCTTTCGTAATAATTTTCTTTATAGTAATACCAATTATAATCGGAGGTTTCGGGAACTGACTCGTTCCCCTAATGATTGGCGCTCCTGATATGGCCTTTCCTCGAATGAATAATATGAGCTTTTGACTTCTTCCCCCATCTTTTTTACTCCTCCTTGCCTCTTCGGGAGTCGAAGCAGGGGCCGGAACCGGATGAACAGTTTACCCGCCCCTCGCCGGAAACCTCGCCCACGCAGGAGCCTCTGTTGACCTAACAATCTTCTCCCTTCACCTAGCAGGTATCTCCTCTATTCTTGGAGCAATCAACTTTATCACAACTATTATTAACATAAAACCCCCTGCTATCTCACAATACCAGACCCCGCTCTTTGTATGATCTGTTCTTATTACTGCCGTCCTACTGCTTCTTTCCCTCCCCGTTCTTGCCGCCGGCATCACAATACTCCTGACAGACCGAAATCTTAACACCACCTTCTTTGACCCTGCCGGAGGAGGGGACCCAATCCTTTACCAACATCTC
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cottus caeruleomentum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 10
Specimens with Barcodes: 10
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
NatureServe

Reviewer/s
Smith, K. & Darwall, W.R.T.

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of the fairly large extent of occurrence, large number of subpopulations and locations, and apparently large population size, and because the species probably is not declining fast enough to qualify for any of the threatened categories.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Population

Population
This species is represented by a large number of occurrences (subpopulations).

This species is common in uplands, uncommon in lowlands (Page and Burr 2011).

Trend over the past 10 years or three generations is uncertain but likely relatively stable.

Population Trend
Stable
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Global Short Term Trend: Relatively stable (=10% change)

Comments: Trend over the past 10 years or three generations is uncertain but likely relatively stable.

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Threats

Major Threats
No major threats are known.
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Least Concern (LC)
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Comments: No major threats are known.

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Currently, this species is of relatively low conservation concern and does not require significant additional protection or major management, monitoring, or research action.
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Wikipedia

Cottus caeruleomentum

Cottus caeruleomentum is a species of sculpin in the family Cottidae. It is known by the common name Blue Ridge sculpin. It is native to the eastern United States, where it can be found in a number of river systems that drain into the Atlantic.[1][2]

This fish is variable in morphology.[3] It is up to about 6.3 centimeters long.[1] In general, the species has dark saddle marks and an incomplete lateral line. There are small spines on the preoperculum and small prickles in the postpectoral area.[3] The breeding male, at least in some regions, has blue to blue-green coloration on the chin, the mouth, the bases of some of the fins, and the membrane connecting the bones around the gills.[4] The fish is very similar to its close relative, Cottus bairdi, particularly the subspecies C. b. bairdi. The latter has notches in the band marking the base of the tail; C. caeruleomentum lacks the notches on one or both sides.[3] C. bairdi lacks the blue breeding coloration; its chin is blackish. The two fish occur together and are known to hybridize.[4]

This fish is native to the states of Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. It can be found in the Elk, Susquehanna, Bush, Patapsco, Patuxent, Potomac, Nanticoke, James, and Roanoke river drainages. The species is common in upland habitat, and less common in lowlands. It lives in creeks, springs, and riffles. In coastal areas it is only found in cold streams.[2]

The diet is made up of invertebrates.[2]

The parasite load of this species has been investigated. The nematode Rhabdochona cotti lives in its intestine.[5] Another nematode was found there and subsequently described as a new species named Freitascapillaria laticauda. It can be over a centimeter long.[6]

References[edit source | edit]

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: A member of the Cottus bairdii complex; recently described as a distinct species (Kinziger et al. 2000).

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