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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Usually found along the coasts and estuaries at a temperature range of 8° to 24°C (Ref. 4944). Often associated with Zostera or other vegetation (Ref. 6733). Ovoviviparous (Ref. 205). The male carries the eggs in a brood pouch which is found under the tail (Ref. 205). Spawns in summer (Ref. 35388).
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Distribution

Baltic Sea, North Sea, Mediterranean Sea, eastern Atlantic: Norway to Morocco.
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Eastern Atlantic: Vardø, Norway, Baltic Sea and the British Isles to Morocco. Also throughout the Mediterranean, Black Sea and Sea of Azov. Record off Ghana is still questionable (Ref. 4509).
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Black Sea and Sea of Azov.
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Physical Description

Size

Maximum size: 300 mm TL
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Max. size

35.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 35388))
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Diagnostic Description

Snout is compressed and taller than the eye diameter (Ref. 35388) and anterior trunk rings not fused ventrally (Ref. 59043).
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Ecology

Habitat

Depth: 4 - 20m.
From 4 to 20 meters.

Habitat: demersal. Usually found along the coasts and estuaries at a temperature range of 8° to 24°C (Ref. 4944). Often associated with @Zostera@ or other vegetation (Ref. 6733).
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Environment

demersal; non-migratory; brackish; marine; depth range 1 - 20 m (Ref. 35388)
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Depth range based on 174 specimens in 2 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 7 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0.6 - 224
  Temperature range (°C): 6.664 - 9.785
  Nitrate (umol/L): 1.212 - 9.184
  Salinity (PPS): 6.901 - 35.139
  Oxygen (ml/l): 5.854 - 8.187
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.236 - 0.807
  Silicate (umol/l): 3.319 - 12.992

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0.6 - 224

Temperature range (°C): 6.664 - 9.785

Nitrate (umol/L): 1.212 - 9.184

Salinity (PPS): 6.901 - 35.139

Oxygen (ml/l): 5.854 - 8.187

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.236 - 0.807

Silicate (umol/l): 3.319 - 12.992
 
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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Male carries the eggs in a brood pouch (Ref. 205, 53335).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Syngnathus typhle

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Syngnathus typhle

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Threats

Not Evaluated
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: of no interest; aquarium: public aquariums
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Wikipedia

Broadnosed pipefish

Broadnosed pipefish, Syngnathus typhle, is a fish of the Syngnathidae family (seahorses and pipefishes). It is native to the Eastern Atlantic from Vardø in Norway, Baltic Sea (north to the Gulf of Finland) and the British Isles at North to Morocco at South. Also in the Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea and Sea of Azov. It is common in the coastal shallow waters, usually on reefs with seagrasses. This species is notable for its "broad" snout, which is as deep as its body.

Description[edit]

The broadnosed pipefish is a slender, elongated fish with a hexagonal cross-section which distinguishes it from its even more threadlike relation the straightnose pipefish (Nerophis ophidion) which has a circular cross-section. The body surface is covered by small bony plates. The head resembles that of a seahorse with a long, laterally flattened snout and obliquely sloping mouth. Unlike the straightnose pipefish, it has a fan-shaped caudal fin. The general colour is greenish, often with various darker mottling, and the belly is yellow. The average size is about 15 to 20 cm (6 to 8 in) with a maximum of 25 cm (10 in).[1]

Distribution[edit]

The broadnosed pipefish is native to the Eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean Sea, the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. Its range extends from Vardø, Norway to Morocco. It is found at depths down to about 20 m (66 ft).[2]

Biology[edit]

The broadnosed pipefish tends to rest in a vertical position among the fronds of seaweed and feeds on plankton such as copepods which it sucks in through its mouth.[1]

This fish breeds in the summer. The male has a brood pouch into which several females deposit clutches of about twenty eggs and where the eggs are fertilised. The fry hatch after about four weeks and are expelled into the open water. Even after this the male continues to provide some parental care as the fry can retreat into the brood pouch in case of danger.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Broad-nosed pipefish: Syngnathus typhle (L.)". NatureGate. Retrieved 2013-12-19. 
  2. ^ "Syngnathus typhle Linnaeus, 1758: Broadnosed pipefish". FishBase. Retrieved 2013-12-19. 
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Syngnathus argentatus

Syngnathus argentatus is a pipefish in the family Syngnathidae (seahorses and pipefish). Its status as a species has been in contention, with some believing it to be a synonym of the similar looking species Syngnathus typhle.[1]

References

  1. ^ Eschmeyer, W. N. (ed). "Catalog of Fishes". California Academy of Sciences. http://research.calacademy.org/redirect?url=http://researcharchive.calacademy.org/research/Ichthyology/catalog/fishcatmain.asp. Retrieved 28 September 2012. 
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