Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Often found on sandy shores among floating or attached seaweeds (Ref. 6733). Ovoviviparous (Ref. 205). The male carries the eggs in a brood pouch which is found under the tail (Ref. 205). Spawns in summer. Young are sometimes caught pelagically in the North Sea (Ref. 35388).
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Distribution

Northeast Atlantic: Bergen, Norway and southern portions British Isles to Bay of Biscay.
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Western Baltic Sea, North Sea, Eastern North Atlantic: North Sea to Bay of Biscay.
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Physical Description

Size

Maximum size: 170 mm TL
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Max. size

17.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 6733))
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Diagnostic Description

Snout cylindrical. Pectoral and caudal fins present. With 13-15 bony plates between head and dorsal fin (Ref. 35388). Caudal fin somewhat angulous, diamond shaped (Ref. 59043).
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Ecology

Habitat

Environment

demersal; non-migratory; brackish; marine; depth range 0 - 15 m (Ref. 35388)
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Depth range based on 595 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 331 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): -9 - 83
  Temperature range (°C): 6.911 - 12.243
  Nitrate (umol/L): 1.687 - 12.040
  Salinity (PPS): 9.183 - 34.967
  Oxygen (ml/l): 5.724 - 7.708
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.353 - 0.675
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.052 - 10.213

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): -9 - 83

Temperature range (°C): 6.911 - 12.243

Nitrate (umol/L): 1.687 - 12.040

Salinity (PPS): 9.183 - 34.967

Oxygen (ml/l): 5.724 - 7.708

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.353 - 0.675

Silicate (umol/l): 2.052 - 10.213
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Depth: 0 - 18m.
Recorded at 18 meters.

Habitat: demersal. Often found on sandy shores among floating or attached seaweeds.
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Associations

Known prey organisms

Syngnathus rostellatus (Syngnathus rostellatus Nilsson's pipefish) preys on:
Copepoda
Balanus balanoides

Based on studies in:
Scotland (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Hall SJ, Raffaelli D (1991) Food-web patterns: lessons from a species-rich web. J Anim Ecol 60:823–842
  • Huxham M, Beany S, Raffaelli D (1996) Do parasites reduce the chances of triangulation in a real food web? Oikos 76:284–300
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Known predators

Syngnathus rostellatus (Syngnathus rostellatus Nilsson's pipefish) is prey of:
Podocotyle staffordi
Hysterothylacium aduncum

Based on studies in:
Scotland (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Huxham M, Beany S, Raffaelli D (1996) Do parasites reduce the chances of triangulation in a real food web? Oikos 76:284–300
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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Male carries the eggs in a brood pouch (Ref. 205).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Syngnathus rostellatus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 12
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Threats

Not Evaluated
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: of no interest; aquarium: public aquariums
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Wikipedia

Lesser pipefish

The Lesser pipefish or Nilsson's pipefish, Syngnathus rostellatus, is a pipefish similar to the greater pipefish, but with no crest above the head. Usually it reaches up to 17 centimetres (6.7 in) in length, maximally 18 centimetres (7.1 in), although in South Wales they are usually not more than 10 to 13 centimetres (3.9 to 5.1 in) long. They have a light to dark green-brown colour with bar-like markings on the sides (compare the greater pipefish). Lesser pipefish are found all around the British Isles and as far as the French coast .[2]

Contents

Anatomy

The head has a long, thin, round snout with a small up-turned mouth; the eyes are small and situated well back towards the gill covers; The body is long and thin, covered with bony plates; the dorsal fin situates halfway along the body, and pelvic fins are found below this. The caudal fin is shaped like a fan, and small pectoral fins are situated behind the gills. The lesser and greater pipefish species differ because one has a crest on the head while one doesn't .[3] However, they are still quite similar: a fully grown lesser pipefish and a young greater pipefish share similar coloration and markings and they both have a caudal fin and swim in a similar style. One distinguishing feature of the lesser pipefish is a continuous black line from the gills down the belly to the tail, although this not very apparent on very young specimens.

Habits

The lesser pipefish feeds on small crustaceans, and makes its habitat in shallow water. In aquariums, this species should be kept at a temperature no more than 18 °C (64 °F) and need to be fed on live food .[2] Breeding takes place in spring and summer. The adult male carries the eggs and young in a brood pouch until they are able enough to fend for themselves. They can carry about 100 eggs. The young will hatch after about 3 weeks and are pelagic.

Translations

The lesser pipefish is known as liten kantnål in Norwegian, mindre kantnål in Swedish, lille tangnål in Danish and Kleine Seenadel in German [4]

References

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