Overview

Distribution

Western Atlantic: Davis Strait; south to Florida; including Campeche Bank, Gulf of Mexico.
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Western North Atlantic.
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Physical Description

Size

Max. size

51.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 31699))
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Type Information

Holotype for Myxine limosa Girard
Catalog Number: USNM 1139
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Collector(s): W. Stimpson
Year Collected: 1849
Locality: Grand Manan, New Brunswick, Canada, Atlantic
Depth (m): 91 to 91
  • Holotype: Girard, C. F. 1860. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 11: 223.
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Ecology

Habitat

Environment

demersal; non-migratory; marine; depth range 75 - 1006 m (Ref. 31699)
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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Copulatory organ absent. The gonads of hagfishes are situated in the peritoneal cavity. The ovary is found in the anterior portion of the gonad, and the testis is found in the posterior part. The animal becomes female if the cranial part of the gonad develops or male if the caudal part undergoes differentiation. If none develops, then the animal becomes sterile. If both anterior and posterior parts develop, then the animal becomes a functional hermaphrodite. However, hermaphroditism being characterised as functional needs to be validated by more reproduction studies (Ref. 51361 ).
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Conservation

Threats

Not Evaluated
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