Overview

Distribution

North America: Extinct; formerly in Big Spring, Madison County in Alabama, USA.
  • Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p. (Ref. 5723)
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endemic to a single state or province

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Absent

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (Zero (no occurrences believed extant)) Apparently extinct. This species is known only from Spring Creek (Big Spring), Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama (Page and Burr 2011).

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Alabama, U.S.A. [extinct].
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Physical Description

Size

Length: 8 cm

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Maximum size: 84 mm TL
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Max. size

9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 27139))
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Type Information

Syntype; Paralectotype for Fundulus albolineatus Gilbert
Catalog Number: USNM 225996
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Collector(s): United States Bureau of Fisheries (USBF)
Year Collected: 1889
Locality: Alabama: Huntsville, Spring Creek, Madison County, Alabama, United States, North America
  • Syntype: Gilbert, C. H. 1891. Bulletin of the United States Fish Commission. 9 (for 1889): 149.; Paralectotype:
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Syntype; Lectotype for Fundulus albolineatus Gilbert
Catalog Number: USNM 125055
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Preparation: Radiograph
Collector(s): United States Bureau of Fisheries (USBF)
Year Collected: 1889
Locality: Alabama: Huntsville, Spring Creek, Madison County, Alabama, United States, North America
  • Syntype: Gilbert, C. H. 1891. Bulletin of the United States Fish Commission. 9 (for 1889): 149.; Lectotype:
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Habitat was a spring-fed stream. Spring Creek is described as a small stream (eighteen feet wide); temperature at time of collection was 65 degrees F.

Systems
  • Freshwater
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Habitat Type: Freshwater

Comments: Habitat was a spring-fed stream. Spring Creek is described as a small stream (eighteen feet wide); temperature at time of collection was 65 degrees F.

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Environment

benthopelagic; non-migratory; freshwater
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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 0 (zero)

Comments: Only one occurrence was ever detected.

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Global Abundance

Zero, no individuals known extant

Comments: Extinct. Only 25 specimens, in one collection, were ever taken.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EX
Extinct

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
NatureServe

Reviewer/s
Smith, K. & Darwall, W.R.T.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Extinct because the species has not been detected for more than a century, despite many attempts to find it. The sole known location has been highly altered.

History
  • 1996
    Extinct
  • 1994
    Extinct
    (Groombridge 1994)
  • 1990
    Extinct
    (IUCN 1990)
  • 1988
    Extinct
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
  • 1986
    Extinct
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1986)
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NX - Presumed Extirpated

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GX - Presumed Extinct

Reasons: Known only from a single collection made in a spring-fed stream in Alabama in the 1889.

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Population

Population
Only one occurrence was ever detected.

It is extinct. Only 25 specimens, in one collection, were ever taken.
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Threats

Major Threats
The only known occurrence locality has been pumped dry on several occasions, banks lined with cement, outflow impounded, and stocked with goldfish and carp.
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Comments: The only known occurrence locality has been pumped dry on several occasions, banks lined with cement, outflow impounded, and stocked with goldfish and carp.

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Extinct (EX)
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is clearly extinct and so does not require protection or management, monitoring, or research action.
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Wikipedia

Whiteline topminnow

The whiteline topminnow, Fundulus albolineatus, was a type of killifish first identified in 1891. It was endemic to Big Spring, Madison County, Alabama, in the United States.

References[edit]

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Currently considered specifically distinct from F. JULISIA of Duck and Caney Fork systems, Coffee County, Tennessee. The genus FUNDULUS was removed from Atheriniformes:Cyprinodontidae and placed in Cyprinodontiformes:Fundulidae by Parenti (1981); pending confirmation based on other character suites, this change was not accepted in the 1991 AFS checklist (Robins et al. 1991). See Wiley (1986) for a study of the evolutionary relationships of FUNDULUS topminnows based on morphological characters. See Cashner et al. (1992) for an allozyme-based phylogenetic analysis of the genus FUNDULUS.

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