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Overview

Brief Summary

WhyReef - Lifestyle

The red cornetfish is a slow swimmer, but can move very quickly when hunting. One of its hunting strategies is hiding behind fatter fish in order to surprise its prey. It can also swim vertically (straight up and down) and hide in plants. It can be found in coral reefs swimming over coral, sandy bottoms, or seagrass. When it is not hunting, it can be found floating and resting near the bottom of the reef.
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Comprehensive Description

Biology

Found in the sublittoral zone (Ref. 11230); inhabits coastal areas over soft bottoms, usually at depths greater than 10 m (Ref. 30573). Benthopelagic (Ref. 58302). Feeds on small fishes and shrimps (Ref. 3401). Maximum length reported is 200 cm TL (Ref. 26999), however, no specimen over 100 cm is known to J.E. Randall (Ref. 11441).
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WhyReef - Fun Facts

The red cornetfish is one of those rare fish without scales. It has a very long, thin body, and can grow over 1m (3.3 feet) in length. Though it may look skinny and harmless, it is a predator that uses its tube-like mouth to suck up prey much bigger than itself, much like a vacuum!
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Distribution

Western Atlantic: 41.2°N to southeastern Florida, USA to Central America
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Western Atlantic: southeastern Florida, USA to Central America according to Ref. 7251, Massachusetts to southern Brazil (Ref. 47377). Also found in Argentina (Ref. 86323). Eastern Atlantic: Galicia, Spain (Ref. 74931), Cape Blanc and Cape Verde to Angola (Ref. 6557). Reported from Walvis Bay, Namibia (Ref. 4272). Indo-Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to the Hawaiian and Tuamoto islands, north to southern Japan and the Ogasawara Islands, south to Victoria, Australia (Ref. 33390). This name has often wrongly been used for the more common Fistularia commersonii (Ref. 2334). Mediterranean: Cadiz, Spain (southern Iberian Peninsula) (Ref. 34227).
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Circumglobal in tropical seas (including Red Sea, Seychelles, Madagascar, Mascarenes, Hawaiian Islands), but not eastern Pacific.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 13 - 15; Analspines: 0; Analsoft rays: 14 - 15
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Size

Maximum size: 2000 mm TL
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Max. size

200 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 26999)); max. published weight: 4,650 g (Ref. 4883)
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Diagnostic Description

Description

Inhabits coastal areas over soft bottoms, usually at depths greater than 10 m. Feeds on small fishes and shrimps (Ref. 3401). A species with a row of narrow bony plates along the side of the body (Ref. 2334) and of reddish or brownish-orange color (Ref. 3132).
  • Anon. (1996). FishBase 96 [CD-ROM]. ICLARM: Los Baños, Philippines. 1 cd-rom pp.
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With a row of bony plates along the midline (absent in F. commersoni); reddish or brownish-orange in color (whereas F. commersoni is greenish-brown).
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Type Information

Type for Fistularia petimba
Catalog Number: USNM 52079
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Preparation: Illustration
Collector(s): P. Jouy
Locality: Hong Kong, China, China, South China Sea, Pacific
  • Type:
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Ecology

Habitat

Known from seamounts and knolls
  • Stocks, K. 2009. Seamounts Online: an online information system for seamount biology. Version 2009-1. World Wide Web electronic publication.
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benthic
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Inhabits coastal areas over soft bottoms, usually at depths greater than 10 m.
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Environment

reef-associated; brackish; marine; depth range 10 - 200 m (Ref. 9563), usually 18 - 57 m (Ref. 47377)
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Depth range based on 1344 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 830 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0.61 - 50000
  Temperature range (°C): 3.170 - 29.336
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.004 - 30.747
  Salinity (PPS): 32.279 - 39.733
  Oxygen (ml/l): 2.062 - 6.429
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.078 - 2.104
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.380 - 47.263

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0.61 - 50000

Temperature range (°C): 3.170 - 29.336

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.004 - 30.747

Salinity (PPS): 32.279 - 39.733

Oxygen (ml/l): 2.062 - 6.429

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.078 - 2.104

Silicate (umol/l): 0.380 - 47.263
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Depth: 10 - 200m.
From 10 to 200 meters.

Habitat: demersal. Inhabits coastal areas over soft bottoms, usually at depths greater than 10 m. Feeds on small fishes and shrimps (Ref. 3401). A species with a row of narrow bony plates along the side of the body (Ref. 2334) and of reddish or brownish-orange color (Ref. 3132).
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Trophic Strategy

Inhabits coral reefs (Ref. 58534). Found in the sublittoral zone (Ref. 11230); inhabits coastal areas over soft bottoms, usually at depths greater than 10 m (Ref. 30573). Benthopelagic (Ref. 58302). Feeds on small fishes and shrimps (Ref. 3401).
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Associations

WhyReef - Menu

It will eat both small and medium fish, and it also eats shrimp and small squids. Since it only eats other animals, it is a carnivore.
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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Diet

Feeds on small fishes and shrimps
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Fistularia petimba (var2)

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Fistularia petimba var 2

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Fistularia petimba var 1

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Fistularia petimba

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 5 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

CTCTATTTTATCTTCGGTGCGTGAGCCCGCATAGTCGGAACTGCCTTA---AGTCTTCTCATCCGAGCAGAGCTTAGCCAGCCCGGCGCACTACTGGGCGAC---GACCAGATCTATAATGTAATCGTTACAGCCCATGCCTTTGTAATAATTTTCTTTATAGTAATACCAATCATGATTGGAGGCTTCGGAAACTGATTAATTCCCCTTATG---ATCGGCGCTCCAGACATGGCCTTTCCCCGGATAAATAACATAAGCTTCTGACTTCTTCCCCCATCCTTCCTGCTCCTCCTAGCATCCTCCGGGGTCGAAGCTGGTGCTGGAACAGGGTGAACAGTCTACCCCCCTCTTGCAGGAAACCTGGCTCACGCCGGAGCTTCCGTAGACCTA---ACAATCTTCTCCCTACACCTGGCAGGTATCTCATCAATCCTAGGAGCCATCAACTTCATCACAACCATTATTAACATAAAACCTCCAGCCATTTCACAATACCAAACACCCCTTTTCGTTTGAGCCGTTCTCATTACCGCCGTACTCCTACTACTCTCACTACCAGTTCTTGCCGCC---GGCATCACCATGCTCTTGACAGACCGGAATCTAAACACTACATTTTTCGACCCAGCAGGAGGAGGCGACCCAATCCTGTACCAACACCTA
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Fistularia petimba

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 11
Specimens with Barcodes: 28
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Threats

Not Evaluated
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WhyReef - Threats

Though not many people catch it to eat, reefs are in danger, and that means so is the home of the red cornetfish!
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: subsistence fisheries
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Wikipedia

Red cornetfish

The red cornetfish, Fistularia petimba, is a cornetfish of the family Fistulariidae, found in tropical oceans worldwide, at depths between 10 and 200 m. In Japan, they are called akayagara (Jap. 赤矢柄; アカヤガラ "red arrow shaft"), and sometimes teppō (鉄砲 or 鉄炮; てっぽう) (rifle) fish. They are up to 2 m in length.

References[edit]

  • Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2006). "Fistularia petimba" in FishBase. May 2006 version.
  • Tony Ayling & Geoffrey Cox, Collins Guide to the Sea Fishes of New Zealand, (William Collins Publishers Ltd, Auckland, New Zealand 1982) ISBN 0-00-216987-8
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