Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

A little known inshore and offshore shark found on continental and insular shelves (Ref. 244). Found to depths of at least 36 m (Ref. 9997). Probably feeds on fishes, cephalopods, and crustaceans (Ref. 6871). Viviparous (Ref. 50449). Commonly caught by inshore demersal gillnet fisheries, especially off Java (Ref.58048). Utilized fresh and probably dried salted for human consumption (Ref. 244). Also used for fishmeal (Ref. 9997) and fins (Ref.58048). Minimum depth from Ref. 58018.
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Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs from the Arabian Gulf to the Gulf of Carpentaria in northern Australia and possibly southern Japan in inshore continental shelf waters.
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Indo-West Pacific: Persian Gulf east to Thailand, Indonesia, China, and Japan. Recorded from the Gulf of Carpentaria (Ref. 6871) and Palau (Ref. 244). This species is very close to Rhizoprionodon taylori, but is geographically separated from it (Ref. 244).
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Indo-West Pacific.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 0; Analspines: 0; Analsoft rays: 0
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Size

Max. size

70 cm TL (female)
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Diagnostic Description

Description

Found on the continental and insular shelves. Common inshore and offshore. Viviparous, with 3 to 5 young per litter. Size at birth between 21 and 26 cm. Probably dried salted for human consumption.
  • Anon. (1996). FishBase 96 [CD-ROM]. ICLARM: Los Baños, Philippines. 1 cd-rom pp.
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Position of anal fin origin well in front of second dorsal fin origin, long labial furrows, and short pectoral fins (Ref. 37816).
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Type Information

Holotype for Rhizoprionodon oligolinx Springer
Catalog Number: USNM 196799
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Collector(s): Thai Fishermen
Year Collected: 1961
Locality: Gulf of Thailand: Trat Province, ca 2-3 mi Offshore W & WSW of Goh Chang., Trat Province, Thailand, Pacific
  • Holotype: Springer, V. G. 1964. Proceedings of the United States National Museum. 115 (3493): 621, figs. 12, 13; pl. 2c; tables 1-38.
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Paratype for Rhizoprionodon oligolinx Springer
Catalog Number: USNM 175349
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Collector(s): K. Jayaram
Year Collected: 1952
Locality: India, Ouilon Travancore State, Kerala, India, Indian
  • Paratype: Springer, V. G. 1964. Proceedings of the United States National Museum. 115 (3493): 621, figs. 12, 13; pl. 2c; tables 1-38.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The biology of this species is poorly known. However, it is likely to have a life history very similar to the Australian sharpnose shark (Rhizoprionodon taylori) which grows to a similar size and has a similar appearance. It is a small shark born at 21 to 26 cm, mature at 35 to 40 cm, and grows to around 70 cm (Last and Stevens 1994). Mature females produce litters of 3 to 5 young, presumably every year (Compagno 1984). Assuming that the life history is similar to that of R. taylori it is assumed to be productive and able to sustain relatively high levels of fishing pressure.

Systems
  • Marine
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Environment

reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 36 m (Ref. 9997)
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Depth range based on 3 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 1 sample.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1.22 - 50
  Temperature range (°C): 29.003 - 29.003
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.114 - 0.114
  Salinity (PPS): 34.179 - 34.179
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.522 - 4.522
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.111 - 0.111
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.684 - 1.684

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 1.22 - 50
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Trophic Strategy

A little known inshore and offshore shark found on continental and insular shelves. Found to depths of at least 36 m. Probably feeds on fishes, cephalopods, and crustaceans.
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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Viviparous, placental (Ref. 50449). With 3 to 5 young per litter (Ref. 244, 37816). Size at birth 20-30 cm TL (Ref. 9997, 37816). Distinct pairing with embrace (Ref. 205).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rhizoprionodon oligolinx

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 22
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2003

Assessor/s
Simpfendorfer, C.A. (SSG Australia & Oceania Regional Workshop, March 2003)

Reviewer/s
Fowler, S. & Cavanagh, R.D. (Shark Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
This is an abundant inshore species across southern Asia, from the Arabian Gulf at least to northern Australia, possibly southern Japan. It is exploited by artisanal, subsistence and commercial fisheries throughout its range, including gillnet, trawl and longline fisheries. In parts of its range exploitation rates are relatively high. However, it is assumed to have a productive life history, like those of better-known species in this genus which enables it to sustain relatively high levels of fishing pressure.
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Population

Population
There are little or no data available on population size anywhere within its range, and there are no indices of trends in population abundance. It is known only from a limited number of specimens from northern Australia, where it is probably rare, and may be a stray from Indonesian waters.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
This species is probably exploited by inshore artisanal, subsistence and commercial fisheries through most of its range. Manjaji (2002) reported it from fish markets in Sabah. No data are available on the magnitude of catches or the impact of fishing on the populations.
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Least Concern (LC)
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are currently no conservation measures in place for this species.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: commercial
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Wikipedia

Grey sharpnose shark

The grey sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon oligolinx, is a requiem shark of the family Carcharhinidae. It is found in the tropical waters of the Indo-West Pacific Oceans, between latitudes 30° N and 18° S, from the surface to a depth of 36 m. It can reach a length of about 70 cm.

It is fished in the Gazetteer Indo-West Pacific and the waters from the Persian Gulf east to Thailand, Indonesia, China, and Japan. It has also been found in the Gulf of Carpentaria and Palau. In appearance and size, this species is very close to Rhizoprionodon taylori.

The diet of the grey sharpnose shark consists of crustaceans, fishes, and cephalopods.

It is commonly caught by inshore demersal gillnet fisheries, especially off Java for fish meal and its fins. It is also killed for human consumption, fresh or dried salted.

It is considered to be harmless to people.

References[edit]

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