Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Chinese (Simplified) (4) (learn more)

Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Lives on continental shelves and upper slopes on or near the bottom. Also found in coastal waters on sand or mud bottoms. Feeds on small bottom organisms using its barbels to poke the bottom with its snout. Ovoviviparous, with 12 young in a litter.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Northwest Pacific: Japan, Korea, northern China. Does not occur in the Western Central Pacific (Ref. 31368).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Western North Pacific.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© FishWise Professional

Source: FishWise Professional

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Size

Max. size

136 cm TL (female)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Pristiophorus japonicus has a long, narrow, and narrowly tapering rostrum (rostrum length is 26-29% of TL), distance from rostral tip to barbels about equal or slightly greater than distance from barbels to mouth (1:1.1-1.2); distance from rostral barbels to nostrils about equal to distance from nostrils to 1st gill slits. About 15-26 large rostral teeth on each side of the rostrum in front of the barbels, 9-17+ behind them; distance from mouth to nostrils 1.1-1.2 times internarial space. Tooth rows 34-58 in upper jaw. Dorsal and pectoral fins covered with denticles in large specimens. Lateral trunk denticles largely unicuspidate. First dorsal fin origin behind free rear tips of pectorals by eye length or more (Ref. 247).Caudal fin almost straight, with slender upper and lower lobes; pectoral well developed but are not ray-like (Ref. 6871).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Environment

demersal; marine; depth range 0 - 500 m (Ref. 54710)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Trophic Strategy

Lives on continental shelves and upper slopes on or near the bottom. Also found in coastal waters on sand or mud bottoms (Ref 247). Also in Ref. 9137. Feeds on small bottom organisms using its barbels to poke the bottom with its snout (Ref 247). A carnivor (Ref. 9137).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Partner Web Site: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Ovoviviparous, embryos feed solely on yolk (Ref. 50449).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Threats

Data deficient (DD)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: commercial
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© FishBase

Source: FishBase

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Japanese sawshark

The Japanese sawshark (Pristiophorus japonicus) is a species of sawshark in the family Pristiophoridae. This shark has a long, narrow rostrum. Its first dorsal fin originates behind the tips of the pectoral fins, and its caudal fin is angled almost straight in line with the body. The Japanese sawshark reaches an maximum length of up to 1.36 m (4 ft 6 in).

Range and Habitat[edit]

Found in the northwest Pacific Ocean around Japan, Korea, and northern China between latitudes 48°N and 22°N. It is found over the sandy or muddy bottoms of the continental shelf at depths of 50 to 800 m (160 to 2,620 ft). This species may vertically migrate in the water column because of changes in temperature.

Behavior[edit]

The Japanese sawshark has a varied diet of small benthic organisms. Like seemingly all sawsharks, this species is ovoviviparous. After an unknown gestation period, the female shark gives live birth to around 12 pups. These pups average around 30 cm (12 in) long. At sexual maturity the male is 80 to 100 cm (31 to 39 in) long, and the female is around 100 cm (39 in) long.

Conservation[edit]

With little information on population size or frequency of bycatch, the Japanese sawshark is listed by the IUCN Red List as being Data Deficient. It is not clear if this shark's apparent rarity is because of natural reasons, or because the population has already been depleted. Due to its benthic lifestyle, and because the range of this shark is heavily fished, it is safe to assume that the Japanese sawshark is at considerable risk of being caught as bycatch in bottom trawling and gillnet operations. Because of its habitat and behavior, this shark poses no threat to humans.

References[edit]

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!