Overview

Comprehensive Description

Gobius niger ZBK Linnaeus, 1758

Sea of Marmara : 22000-436 (5 spc.), 08.07.1967 . Aegean Sea : 22000-435 (4 spc.), 1969 , M. Demir ; 22000-426 (1 spc.), 1969, M. Demir .

  • Nurettin Meriç, Lütfiye Eryilmaz, Müfit Özulug (2007): A catalogue of the fishes held in the Istanbul University, Science Faculty, Hydrobiology Museum. Zootaxa 1472, 29-54: 50-50, URL:http://www.zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:428F3980-C1B8-45FF-812E-0F4847AF6786
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Biology

Found in estuaries, lagoons and inshore waters over sand or mud, in seagrass or on algae (Ref. 4696). Occasionally recorded in freshwater, but there are no documented records of actual occurrence in European freshwaters (Ref. 59043). Feed on crustaceans (larger amphipods, isopods, shrimps, mysids, small crabs), bivalves, gastropods, polychaetes, chironomid larvae, sometimes small fish (Ref. 4696).
  • Miller, P.J. 1986 Gobiidae. p. 1019-1085. In P.J.P. Whitehead, M.-L. Bauchot, J.-C. Hureau, J. Nielsen and E. Tortonese (eds.) Fishes of the North-eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean. Volume 3. UNESCO, Paris. (Ref. 4696)
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Description

 The black goby is up to 17 cm in length with the thick-set head being a quarter of the total length. In colour this species is a dark-grey or brown with lighter markings, each dorsal fin has small black mark its front end. Gobies have 2 dorsal fins and this goby species has a pointed first dorsal fin.This species can be confused with the rock goby as the two species are similar in size and colour, however the rock goby lives in rocky areas whereas the black goby prefers sand and mud.
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Description

This is a large and stout bodied goby with adults reaching a maximum length of approximately 17cm. It is usually greyish-brown in colour with darker and paler mottling and patches. Despite its common name it is not as dark as breeding males of the rock goby (Gobius paganellus). Lines of black sensory papillae are visible on the head. The most distinctive characteristic is the elongate, first dorsal fin, this is most obvious in males. The black goby is sometimes confused with the rock goby (Gobius paganellus) however the latter is confined to rocky areas whilst the black goby lives in sandy or muddy areas. The two species can easily be differentiated by the shape of the first dorsal fin which is elongate and triangular in the black goby.
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Distribution

Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea: throughout North Africa from Cape Blanc, Mauritania north and eastwards to the Suez Canal; also along the eastern Atlantic coast northwards to Trondheim (Norway) and Baltic Sea. Also known from the Black Sea (Ref. 4646).
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Baltic Sea, North Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea, eastern Atlantic: Norway to Mauritania including eastern Canary Islands; Red Sea immigrant (Gulf of Suez).
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This species is widespread all around the coasts of Britain and Ireland.
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Physical Description

Size

Maximum size: 150 mm TL
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Max. size

18.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 35388)); max. reported age: 4 years (Ref. 35388)
  • Muus, B.J. and J.G. Nielsen 1999 Sea fish. Scandinavian Fishing Year Book, Hedehusene, Denmark. 340 p. (Ref. 35388)
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Diagnostic Description

Neck scaled with a black spot in the front end of each dorsal fin (Ref. 35388); body shape is terete, slightly depressed; eyes situated dorso-laterally; reduced swim bladders (Ref. 92840).
  • Muus, B.J. and J.G. Nielsen 1999 Sea fish. Scandinavian Fishing Year Book, Hedehusene, Denmark. 340 p. (Ref. 35388)
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Ecology

Habitat

Environment

demersal; brackish; marine; depth range 84 - 96 m (Ref. 86376), usually 1 - 50 m (Ref. 35388)
  • Muus, B.J. and J.G. Nielsen 1999 Sea fish. Scandinavian Fishing Year Book, Hedehusene, Denmark. 340 p. (Ref. 35388)
  • Ahnelt, H. and J. Dorda 2004 Gobioid fishes from the north eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean: new records and rarely found species. Ann. Naturhist. Mus. Wien 105B: 5-19. (Ref. 86376)
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Depth range based on 3684 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 210 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): -9 - 169
  Temperature range (°C): 7.695 - 19.656
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.729 - 8.721
  Salinity (PPS): 22.343 - 38.037
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.958 - 7.118
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.102 - 0.700
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.178 - 10.823

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): -9 - 169

Temperature range (°C): 7.695 - 19.656

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.729 - 8.721

Salinity (PPS): 22.343 - 38.037

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.958 - 7.118

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.102 - 0.700

Silicate (umol/l): 1.178 - 10.823
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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 This species lives in shallow coastal or estuarine waters, rarely on shore. It lives amongst Zostera or algae on sandy or muddy bottoms, at depths between 1 and 50 m.
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Depth: 50 - 75m.
From 50 to 75 meters.

Habitat: demersal. Found in estuaries, lagoons and inshore waters over sand or mud, in seagrass or on algae. Feeds on crustaceans (larger amphipods, isopods, shrimps, mysids, small crabs), bivalves, gastropods, polychaetes, chironomid larvae, sometimes small fish (Ref. 4696).
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The black goby lives in sandy or muddy areas or on rock that is covered by sediment. It can tolerate reduced salinity and so is also found in estuaries, lagoons and sea loughs. It mainly feeds on small crustaceans, small fish, molluscs and worms.
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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Repeat spawner (Ref. 4696). Male guards eggs.
  • Miller, P.J. 1986 Gobiidae. p. 1019-1085. In P.J.P. Whitehead, M.-L. Bauchot, J.-C. Hureau, J. Nielsen and E. Tortonese (eds.) Fishes of the North-eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean. Volume 3. UNESCO, Paris. (Ref. 4696)
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Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 5 years (captivity)
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Gobius niger

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Gobius niger

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 28
Specimens with Barcodes: 37
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Threats

Not Evaluated
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: of no interest; aquarium: commercial
  • Burgess, W.E., H.R. Axelrod and R.E. Hunziker III 1990 Dr. Burgess's atlas of marine aquarium fishes. T.F.H. Publications, Inc., Neptune City, New Jersey. 768 p. (Ref. 9210)
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Wikipedia

Black goby

Gobius niger, the Black Goby, is a species of ray-finned fish found in the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea. It inhabits estuaries, lagoons, and inshore water over seagrass and algae. It feeds on a variety of invertebrates and sometimes small fish. This species can also be found in the aquarium trade.[1]

This fish reaches a maximum length of 18 centimetres (7 in) TL. This fish's neck is scaled and both of its dorsal fins have a black spot on the front end.[1]

Description[edit]

The black goby is deeper-bodied than the common goby, sand goby and two-spotted goby with a more rounded snout and generally a larger size. It has two dorsal fins that are almost continuous, the anterior one having six spines, which may project from the fin membrane, and the posterior and shorter one having soft rays. The posterior dorsal fin terminates close to the caudal peduncle in contrast to the common and sand gobies where there is a long gap. The pelvic fins are fused. The colour is some shade of dark brown with indistinct black blotches. The colour of the male becomes almost black during the breeding season and his fins become more vivid. The average size of this fish is about 5 to 7 cm (2.0 to 2.8 in)[2]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

The black goby is native to shallow waters in the eastern Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea and the Black Sea. Its range extends from Cape Blanc in Mauritania to Trondheim in Norway and the Baltic Sea and it is usuallty found at depths less than 50 metres (160 ft). Its typical habitat is lagoons, estuaries and inshore waters, on sandy or muddy bottoms and among seagrasses and seaweeds, and it occasionally moves into fresh water.[1]

Behaviour[edit]

The black goby feeds on small invertebrates on the seabed. It breeds in the summer at which time the male creates a territory in a shallow weedy area and prepares a nest on a clean piece of seabed. He invites the female to inspect it and if she approves, she lays her eggs there and the male guards them until they hatch.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2013). "Gobius niger" in FishBase. June 2013 version.
  2. ^ a b "Black goby: Gobius niger (L.)". NatureGate. Retrieved 2013-12-18. 
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