Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Aquarium keeping: in groups of 5 or more individuals; minimum aquarium size 60 cm (Ref. 51539).
  • Weitzman, S.H. and L. Palmer 1997 A new species of Hyphessobrycon (Teleostei: Characidae) from Neblina region of Venezuela and Brazil, with comments on the putative 'rosy tetra clade'. Ichthyol. Explor. Freshwat. 7(3):209-242. (Ref. 13676)
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Distribution

Range Description

This species is found in the Amazon River basin, in Brazil and Peru.
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South America: Amazon River basin.
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Amazon River basin, Brazil.
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Physical Description

Size

Maximum size: 40 mm SL
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Max. size

4.3 cm SL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 13676))
  • Weitzman, S.H. and L. Palmer 1997 A new species of Hyphessobrycon (Teleostei: Characidae) from Neblina region of Venezuela and Brazil, with comments on the putative 'rosy tetra clade'. Ichthyol. Explor. Freshwat. 7(3):209-242. (Ref. 13676)
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Type Information

Syntype for Hyphessobrycon bentosi Durbin
Catalog Number: USNM 120270
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Year Collected: 1865
Locality: Obidos, Brazil, Brazil, South America
  • Syntype: Durbin. 1908. Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. 52 (6): 101.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
H. bentosi is a benthopelagic (ecological region at the lowest level of water body) species that inhabits creeks. Lives in moderate flow streams and small rivers, associated flood plain lakes. Likes to be around submerged vegetation.

Systems
  • Freshwater
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Environment

benthopelagic; freshwater; pH range: 5.8 - 7.5; dH range: 5 - 19
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Diseases and Parasites

White spot Disease. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
  • Bassleer, G. 1997 Color guide of tropical fish diseases: on freshwater fish. Bassleer Biofish, Westmeerbeek, Belgium. 272 p. (Ref. 41805)
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Viral Diseases (general). Viral diseases
  • Bassleer, G. 2003 The new ilustrated guide to fish diseases in ornamental tropical and pond fish. Bassleer Biofish, Stationstraat 130, 2235 Westmeerbeek, Belgium, 1st Edition, 232p. (Ref. 48502)
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Turbidity of the Skin (Freshwater fish). Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
  • Bassleer, G. 2003 The new ilustrated guide to fish diseases in ornamental tropical and pond fish. Bassleer Biofish, Stationstraat 130, 2235 Westmeerbeek, Belgium, 1st Edition, 232p. (Ref. 48502)
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Black spot Disease 3. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
  • Bassleer, G. 1997 Color guide of tropical fish diseases: on freshwater fish. Bassleer Biofish, Westmeerbeek, Belgium. 272 p. (Ref. 41805)
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Black Spot Disease 2. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
  • Bassleer, G. 1997 Color guide of tropical fish diseases: on freshwater fish. Bassleer Biofish, Westmeerbeek, Belgium. 272 p. (Ref. 41805)
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Black Spot Disease 1. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
  • Bassleer, G. 1997 Color guide of tropical fish diseases: on freshwater fish. Bassleer Biofish, Westmeerbeek, Belgium. 272 p. (Ref. 41805)
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Bacterial Infections (general). Bacterial diseases
  • Bassleer, G. 1997 Color guide of tropical fish diseases: on freshwater fish. Bassleer Biofish, Westmeerbeek, Belgium. 272 p. (Ref. 41805)
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hyphessobrycon bentosi

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 9
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hyphessobrycon cf. bentosi

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 16
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2009

Assessor/s
Reis, R & Lima, F.

Reviewer/s
Collen, B., Darwall, W., Ram, M. & Smith, K. (SRLI Freshwater Fish Evaluation Workshop)

Contributor/s

Justification
Widespread and not under any threat, this is a Least Concern species.
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Population

Population
This species has a stable population trend at present.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
No threats are currently known to be causing a concern to this species; it is thought to be harvested on a small scale for the pet trade, with the majority being bred in captivity.
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Least Concern (LC)
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no conservation measures in place.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

aquarium: commercial
  • Robins, C.R., R.M. Bailey, C.E. Bond, J.R. Brooker, E.A. Lachner, R.N. Lea and W.B. Scott 1991 World fishes important to North Americans. Exclusive of species from the continental waters of the United States and Canada. Am. Fish. Soc. Spec. Publ. (21):243 p. (Ref. 4537)
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Wikipedia

Hyphessobrycon bentosi

Hyphessobrycon bentosi, the ornate tetra, is a species of characin found in sluggish tributaries at the Amazon Basin in Brazil and Peru. It can grow up to 4 cm (1.6"). Males have longer dorsal and anal fins and appear slightly larger than females.[1] Occasionally, it makes its way into the aquarium trade. It has often been confused with the rosy tetra.

Description[edit]

The ornate tetra is silvery pink. It has a dark spot around the gills, which people use to distinguish the ornate tetra from the rosy tetra.[2] Its dorsal fin is black and has a white tip on it.

Distribution[edit]

The ornate tetra lives in sluggish tributaries of the Amazon River in the Amazon Basin.[3]

Ecology[edit]

In the wild, the trophic level for this fish is 2.9[4]

Habitat[edit]

The species Hyphessobrycon bentosi lives in water with a pH range from 5.8 to 7.5, a dH range of 5 to 19, and a temperature of 24 to 28°C.[4]

Diet[edit]

It is an omnivorous fish that feeds on small invertebrates.

In the Aquarium[edit]

Ornate tetras are kept in the aquarium hobby. Most individuals in the aquarium trade are bred commercially over collecting them in the wild.[5] They have been sold as bentos tetras, white tip tetras, or false rosy tetras in certain stores.[3]

References[edit]


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