Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Adults found on mud bottoms, from 305 (Ref. 2850) to 2,740 m depth (Ref. 2850). Young-of-the-year juveniles are pelagic and found on the surface and near-shore waters (Ref. 28499). Generally localized, but some juveniles have been found to migrate over 2,000 miles in 6 or 7 years (Ref. 28499). Feed on crustaceans, worms and small fishes (Ref. 4925). Most of the catch is marketed in Japan (Ref. 28499). Utilized fresh, dried or salted and smoked (Ref. 9988), can be steamed, pan-fried, broiled, boiled, microwaved and baked (Ref. 9988). The liver oil is rich in vitamin A and D (Ref. 4925). Reported to reach 57 kg in Ref. 2850. The US North Pacific sablefish fishery of this species has been certified by the Marine Stewardship Council (http://www.msc.org/) as well-managed and sustainable (http://www.msc.org/html/content_1268.htm).
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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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North Pacific: Bering Sea coasts of Kamchatka, Russia and Alaska southward to Hatsu Shima I., southern Japan and Cedros I., central Baja California, Mexico
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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North Pacific: Bering Sea coasts of Kamchatka, Russia and Alaska southward to Hatsu Shima Island, southern Japan and Cedros Island, central Baja California, Mexico.
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North Pacific: Bering Sea to central Baja California and to central Honshu, Japan.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 19 - 27; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16 - 20; Analspines: 3; Analsoft rays: 15 - 19
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Size

Maximum size: 1200 mm TL
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Max. size

120 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 9988)); max. reported age: 65 years (Ref. 39324)
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Diagnostic Description

Dorsal fins well separated; 2nd dorsal fin sub equal to anal fin in size and form, and opposite in position. Reaches over 1 m in SL.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat Type: Marine

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Known from seamounts and knolls
  • Stocks, K. 2009. Seamounts Online: an online information system for seamount biology. Version 2009-1. World Wide Web electronic publication.
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benthic
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Adults found on mud bottoms, from 305-1,829 m depth. Young-of-the-year juveniles are pelagic and found on the surface and nearshore waters.
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Environment

bathydemersal; oceanodromous (Ref. 51243); marine; depth range 0 - 2740 m (Ref. 6793)
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Depth range based on 2632 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 1695 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 50000
  Temperature range (°C): 1.765 - 14.572
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.462 - 44.379
  Salinity (PPS): 31.271 - 34.642
  Oxygen (ml/l): 0.303 - 7.285
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.450 - 3.485
  Silicate (umol/l): 3.501 - 174.122

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 50000

Temperature range (°C): 1.765 - 14.572

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.462 - 44.379

Salinity (PPS): 31.271 - 34.642

Oxygen (ml/l): 0.303 - 7.285

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.450 - 3.485

Silicate (umol/l): 3.501 - 174.122
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Depth: 0 - 2740m.
Recorded at 2740 meters.

Habitat: bathydemersal.
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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Oceanodromous. Migrating within oceans typically between spawning and different feeding areas, as tunas do. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
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Trophic Strategy

Adults found on mud bottoms, from 305 (Ref. 2850) to 2,740 m depth (Ref. 2850). Young-of-the-year juveniles are pelagic and found on the surface and near-shore waters (Ref. 28499). Generally localized, but some juveniles have been found to migrate over 2,000 miles in 6 or 7 years (Ref. 28499). Feed on crustaceans, worms and small fishes (Ref. 4925). Is an omnivorous predatory fish of the continental slope of the northern Pacific. Its food includes planktonic, benthic, nectobenthic and nectonic organisms (Ref. 42024).
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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Diet

Feed on crustaceans, worms and small fishes
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 114 years (wild)
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Anoplopoma fimbria

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 29 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

GATATTGGCACCCTTTATCTAGTATTTGGTGCATGAGCCGGAATAGTAGGCACAGCATTAAGCCTTCTCATCCGAGCAGAGTTAAGCCAACCTGGCGCCCTCTTGGGCGACGACCAAATCTATAACGTAATTGTTACTGCGCATGCTTTCGTAATAATTTTCTTTATAGTAATGCCAATTATGATCGGCGGGTTTGGAAACTGACTCATCCCACTAATGATCGGAGCTCCCGATATAGCATTCCCTCGAATAAACAACATAAGCTTTTGATTACTCCCCCCTTCTTTCCTGCTTCTTCTCGCCTCTTCTGGTGTAGAAGCCGGGGCAGGGACAGGGTGAACAGTATACCCCCCTCTCGCCAGTAACTTGGCCCATGCCGGAGCATCCGTTGATCTAACCATCTTCTCCCTCCACTTAGCAGGTATCTCCTCAATTCTCGGGGCAATTAACTTTATTACAACCATTATTAACATGAAACCTCCTGCTATCTCTCAGTATCAGACGCCCCTTTTCGTATGGGCCGTTCTCATCACTGCAGTCCTTCTCCTTCTCTCCCTTCCAGTCCTAGCTGCTGGCATTACAATGCTCCTAACAGACCGAAATTTAAACACCACCTTCTTCGACCCAGCAGGCGGGGGTGACCCCATTCTTTACCAACACCTATTCTGATTCTTCGG
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Anoplopoma fimbria

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 31
Specimens with Barcodes: 36
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Threats

Not Evaluated
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: highly commercial; aquaculture: likely future use; aquarium: public aquariums; price category: very high; price reliability: reliable: based on ex-vessel price for this species
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Wikipedia

Sablefish

The sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria, is one of two members of the fish family Anoplopomatidae and the only species in the Anoplopoma genus.[1] In English, common names for it include sable (USA), black cod (USA, UK, Canada), blue cod (UK), bluefish (UK), candlefish (UK), coal cod (UK), coalfish (Canada), beshow, and skil(fish) (Canada), although many of these names also refer to other, unrelated, species.[2] In the USA, the FDA accepts only "sablefish" as the Acceptable Market Name; "black cod" is considered a vernacular (regional) name and should not be used as a Statement of Identity for this species.[3] The sablefish is found in muddy sea beds in the North Pacific at depths of 300 to 2,700 m (1000 to 9000 ft) and is commercially important to Japan.

The white flesh of the sablefish is soft-textured and mildly flavored. It is considered a delicacy in many countries. When cooked, its flaky texture is similar to Patagonian toothfish (Chilean sea bass). The meat has a high fat content and can be prepared in many ways, including grilling, smoking, or frying, or served as sushi. Sablefish flesh is high in long-chain omega 3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA. It contains about as much as wild salmon.[4]

Ecology[edit]

The sablefish is a species of deep sea fish common to the North Pacific ocean.[5] Adult sablefish are opportunistic feeders, preying on fish (including Alaskan pollock, eulachon, capelin, herring, sandlance, and Pacific cod), squid, euphausiids, and jellyfish.[6] Sablefish are long-lived, with a maximum recorded age of 94 years.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2005). "Anoplopoma fimbria" in FishBase. 10 2005 version.
  2. ^ List of common names at Fishbase
  3. ^ 2010 FDA Seafood Complete List http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/SEARCH_SEAFOOD/index.cfm?other=complete
  4. ^ http://www.fishwatch.gov/seafood_profiles/species/cod/species_pages/sablefish.htm#seafood-tab
  5. ^ "Anoplopoma fimbria". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 24 January 2006. 
  6. ^ Yang, M-S and M. W. Nelson 2000. Food habits of the commercially important groundfishes in the Gulf of Alaska in 1990, 1993, and 1996. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-AFSC-112. 174 p.
  7. ^ Kimura, Daniel K., A. M. Shaw and F. R. Shaw 1998. Stock Structure and movement of tagged sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria, in offshore northeast Pacific waters and the effects of El Nino-Southern Oscillation on migration and growth. Fish. Bull. 96:462-481.

Further reading[edit]

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