Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Adults inhabit coral reefs and adjacent rubble, sand and seagrass habitats (typically along the edges of coral rich fringing reef slopes, Ref. 9710). Feed mainly on hard-shelled invertebrates, especially mollusks (Ref. 5374). Oviparous, distinct pairing during breeding (Ref. 205).
  • Randall, J.E. 1986 Red Sea reef fishes. London, Immel Publishing. 192 p. (Ref. 8883)
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Distribution

Range Description

This species is found in the Red Sea, Horn of Africa, coasts of Yemen, Oman and the mouth of the Arabian Gulf.
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Western Indian Ocean: Red Sea to the Gulf of Oman.
  • Randall, J.E. 1986 Red Sea reef fishes. London, Immel Publishing. 192 p. (Ref. 8883)
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Red Sea, northwestern Indian Ocean: Gulf of Aden to Gulf of Oman.
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Physical Description

Size

Maximum size: 500 mm TL
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Max. size

50.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 8883))
  • Randall, J.E. 1986 Red Sea reef fishes. London, Immel Publishing. 192 p. (Ref. 8883)
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Diagnostic Description

Description

Occurs on coral reefs and adjacent rubble, sand and seagrass habitats (typically along the edges of coral rich fringing reef slopes, Ref. 9710). Feeds mainly on hard-shelled invertebrates , especially molluscs (Ref. 5374).
  • Anon. (1996). FishBase 96 [CD-ROM]. ICLARM: Los Baños, Philippines. 1 cd-rom pp.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species inhabits coral reefs and adjacent rubble, sand and seagrass habitats typically along the edges of coral rich fringing reef slopes, (Lieske and Myers 1994). It feeds mainly on hard-shelled invertebrates, especially mollusks (Gomon and Randall 1984). It is generally associated in colonies of 4-8 individuals with single large males.

Preliminary demographic work (J.H. Choat, pers. comm. 2008) shows Oman populations have maximum age of 19 years and a rapid growth rate in males to ~55cm TL. It is protogynous. Primary and initial color phases Randall (1995). Juveniles are found in shallower water. Adult depth distribution ranges from 5-45m.

It has many similar characteristics to Cheilinus undulatus (large size rapid growth of males, low densities) but maximum size and age are smaller and younger.

Systems
  • Marine
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Environment

reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 30 m (Ref. 9710)
  • Lieske, E. and R. Myers 1994 Collins Pocket Guide. Coral reef fishes. Indo-Pacific & Caribbean including the Red Sea. Haper Collins Publishers, 400 p. (Ref. 9710)
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Depth range based on 7 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 2 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 2 - 7
  Temperature range (°C): 26.151 - 26.151
  Nitrate (umol/L): 3.114 - 3.114
  Salinity (PPS): 36.032 - 36.032
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.462 - 4.462
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.546 - 0.546
  Silicate (umol/l): 4.277 - 4.277

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 2 - 7
 
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Depth: 2 - 30m.
From 2 to 30 meters.

Habitat: reef-associated.
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Trophic Strategy

Inhabits coral reefs and adjacent rubble, sand and seagrass habitats (typically along the edges of coral rich fringing reef slopes ). Feeds mainly on hard-shelled invertebrates, especially mollusks.
  • Randall, J.E. 1986 Red Sea reef fishes. London, Immel Publishing. 192 p. (Ref. 8883)
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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Oviparous, distinct pairing during breeding (Ref. 205).
  • Breder, C.M. and D.E. Rosen 1966 Modes of reproduction in fishes. T.F.H. Publications, Neptune City, New Jersey. 941 p. (Ref. 205)
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Choat, J.H.

Reviewer/s
Sadovy, Y. & Carpenter, K.E.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is a large wrasse with a restricted distribution in the Arabian peninsular. There is little published information on its abundance and demography. It is fished over its range mostly for subsistence fishing although this is not thought to be a major threat. It is therefore listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
This species is a north-western Indian Ocean and Red Sea endemic with a restricted range size. It is another one of the big wrasses which has a very low abundance on the local scale and in this case a limited geographical distribution (J.H. Choat pers. comm. 2008).

There are few estimates of abundance but as with most large wrasses, species is rare. Abundance in the Red Sea ranges from 0.1 to 1.7 per hectare. It is more abundant on the coast of Oman (up to three per hectare JHC unpublished).
It does not extend into the central and northern reaches of the Arabian Gulf (A.M. Ayling pers. comm. 2008).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats known for this species.

This species is impacted by subsistence line and trap fishing. It is usually present in low numbers in the Muscat fish market. Low fishing pressure must be evaluated in the context of local rarity and a restricted geographic range.
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Least Concern (LC)
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no specific conservation measures in place for this species.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: minor commercial; aquarium: commercial; price category: very high; price reliability: very questionable: based on ex-vessel price for species in this family
  • Burgess, W.E., H.R. Axelrod and R.E. Hunziker III 1990 Dr. Burgess's atlas of marine aquarium fishes. T.F.H. Publications, Inc., Neptune City, New Jersey. 768 p.
  • Gomon, M.F. and J.E. Randall 1984 Labridae. In W. Fischer and G. Bianchi (eds.) FAO species identification sheets for fishery purposes. Western Indian Ocean fishing area 51. Vol. 2. (Ref. 5374)
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Wikipedia

Cheilinus lunulatus

The broomtail wrasse, Cheilinus lunulatus, is a species of wrasse native to the Red Sea.

Description[edit]

Cheilinus lunulatus can reach an average length of about 35 cm (14 in), with a maximum of 50 cm (20 in) in males. In adults, the head is large and bright green, with small spots. The lips are large and blue. The pectoral fins are yellow, while the abdominal, the anal, and caudal fins are dark blue. The body is yellow-green in the middle and dark purple in the other part. Close to the operculum is a characteristic bright-yellow marking on a black background. It has a long fringed caudal fin, resembling an old broom (hence the common name). Females and juveniles show large, dark stripes on their flanks. This wrasse feeds mainly on molluscs and hard-shelled invertebrates. It is oviparous.

Distribution[edit]

This species occurs in the Red Sea to the Gulf of Oman (mainly near Djibouti, Eritrea, the Seychelles, and Somalia). In the Indo-Pacific, it is replaced by the closely related Cheilinus trilobatus.

Habitat[edit]

Broomtail wrasses can be found on coral reefs and on adjacent sand and seagrass habitats, at depths of from {{convert|2|to|30|m|ft}|abbr=on}.


References[edit]

  1. ^ Choat, J.H. 2010. Cheilinus lunulatus. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.1. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 02 November 2013.
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