Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

A food fish for humans (Ref. 4537).
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Distribution

Range Description

The species is widely spread in east Asia, with the Amur River being the northern border and the Lam River (Viet Nam) being the southern border of distribution range (Berg 1964, Bogutskaya and Naseka 1996, Chen et al. 1998, Kottelat 2001). It is a relatively warm water species, so it avoids mountain streams and is completely absent in the upper Amur River basin (Berg 2001). It was introduced in Uzbekistan (Kamilov and Urchinov 1995).
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Asia: Eastern Asia from the Amur basin to the Red (Coi) River.
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China and Siberia.
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Physical Description

Size

Maximum size: 2000 mm TL
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Max. size

200 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 4537)); max. published weight: 40.0 kg (Ref. 56557)
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The speciesmatures at the age of six years, at which time its length can exceed 60 cm. It spawns in streams from the beginning of June to mid-August. The fish's main spawning grounds are in the mid-Amur River, Songhua and Ussuri. Fry and young fish feed in the lower Amur. After spawning, adult fish travel to the slow moving, off-channel floodplains, but winter in the main branches of these rivers. Its main food is small, pelagic fish (excluding Carp).

Systems
  • Freshwater
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Environment

benthopelagic; potamodromous (Ref. 51243); freshwater; pH range: 7.0 - 7.5; dH range: 10 - 20
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Migration

Potamodromous. Migrating within streams, migratory in rivers, e.g. Saliminus, Moxostoma, Labeo. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Huckstorf, V.

Reviewer/s
Freyhof, J., Luedtke, J. & Allen, D.J.

Contributor/s

Justification
In some regions, this fish is known to have massively declined in the last 20-40 years, primarily due to overfishing and river modifications (e.g. dam construction). In spite of this, the species has been assessed as Data Deficient due to a lack of information regarding its population trends over the entirety of its range.
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Population

Population
Native populations have massively declined in the last 20-40 years in Russia and China. In recent years, however, the population of this species has increased (Novomodny et al. 2004).

Population Trend
Increasing
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Threats

Major Threats
Major threats to this species are overfishing, dam construction and water pollution.
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Data deficient (DD)
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It is not known if there are any conservation measures in place or needed.
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Wikipedia

Elopichthys bambusa

Elopichthys bambusa, the yellowcheek or kanyu, is a cyprinid fish that is found in eastern Asia. It ranges from the Amur River in Russia, through China to the Lam River in Vietnam. It is considered an important food fish where it occurs, reaching up to 2 m (6 ft 7 in) in length.

References[edit]

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