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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Generally uncommon species found in steep outer lagoon and seaward reef slopes (Ref. 9710, 48637). Maximum depth reported at 40m (Ref. 37792) Occurs singly or in large schools (Ref. 9710, 48637). Usually seen swimming steadily along upper edges of drop-offs in pursuit of plankton (Ref. 48637). A semi-pelagic fish that feeds on zooplankton, but remains over or near reefs. Also feeds on algae (Ref. 30573). It is cleaned by Labroides and sleeps on reefs at night, taking on a disruptive mottled pattern (Ref. 10671). Caught with nets (Ref. 30573).
  • Randall, J.E. 1994 Unicornfishes of the subgenus Axinurus Perciformes: Acanthuridae: Naso), with description of a new species. Copeia 1994(1):116-124. (Ref. 10671)
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Distribution

Range Description

Naso thynnoides is widespread from East Africa to the Marshall and Solomon Islands, northwards to the Ryukyu Islands, south to the Solomon Islands and the Great Barrier Reef. It is also known from American Samoa, Johnston Atoll and Tuamoto archipelago. It is probably more widespread in the central Pacific than current records indicate (R.F. Myers pers. comm. 2010).
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Indo-West Pacific: East Africa, Seychelles and western Mascarenes east to Caroline Islands (Micronesia).
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Indo-Pacific: East Africa to Micronesia (excluding the Marshall Islands), north to the Ryukyu Islands, south to the Solomon Islands and the Great Barrier Reef. Range extending to Rangiroa Atoll, Tuamotu Archipelago.
  • Randall, J.E. 2002 Surgeonfishes of the world. Mutual Publishing and Bishop Museum Press, Hawai'i. 123 p. (Ref. 37792)
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 4; Dorsal soft rays (total): 28 - 30; Analspines: 2; Analsoft rays: 27 - 29
  • Masuda, H., K. Amaoka, C. Araga, T. Uyeno and T. Yoshino 1984 The fishes of the Japanese Archipelago. Vol. 1. Tokai University Press, Tokyo, Japan. 437 p. (text). (Ref. 559)
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Size

Maximum size: 400 mm FL
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Max. size

40.0 cm FL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 9710))
  • Lieske, E. and R. Myers 1994 Collins Pocket Guide. Coral reef fishes. Indo-Pacific & Caribbean including the Red Sea. Haper Collins Publishers, 400 p. (Ref. 9710)
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Diagnostic Description

Body elongate-ovate. Dorsal and anal profiles nearly even. Forehead without rostral prominence when in adults. Peduncular plate single, with a semicircular, retrorsely curved keel. Reaches 35 cm SL.Description: Characterized further by overall pale grey body color; side of body with broad yellowish zone and numerous thin bluish-grey bars; greatest depth of body 2.8-3.2 in SL (Ref. 90102).
  • Masuda, H., K. Amaoka, C. Araga, T. Uyeno and T. Yoshino 1984 The fishes of the Japanese Archipelago. Vol. 1. Tokai University Press, Tokyo, Japan. 437 p. (text). (Ref. 559)
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Description

Inhabits rocky areas and coral reefs.
  • Anon. (1996). FishBase 96 [CD-ROM]. ICLARM: Los Baños, Philippines. 1 cd-rom pp.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Naso thynnoides is usually seen in small roving aggregations feeding on zooplankton. It occurs both in the protected waters of lagoons and in exposed outer reef areas from the shallows to at least 40 m, but generally more than 10 m. It sleeps on reefs at night at which time it takes on a disruptive mottled color pattern. The maximum age recorded was 4-5 years. N. thynnoides has high turnover rate (R. Abesamis & J.H. Choat pers comm. 2010).

The sexes are separate among the acanthurids (Reeson 1983). Acanthurids do not display obvious sexual dimorphism, males assume courtship colours (J.H. Choat pers. comm. 2010).


Systems
  • Marine
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Environment

reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 40 m (Ref. 48637), usually 10 - ? m
  • Kuiter, R.H. and T. Tonozuka 2001 Pictorial guide to Indonesian reef fishes. Part 3. Jawfishes - Sunfishes, Opistognathidae - Molidae. Zoonetics, Australia. p. 623-893. (Ref. 48637)
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Depth range based on 2 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 1 sample.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 5 - 32
  Temperature range (°C): 26.922 - 26.922
  Nitrate (umol/L): 1.220 - 1.220
  Salinity (PPS): 35.085 - 35.085
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.476 - 4.476
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.298 - 0.298
  Silicate (umol/l): 3.255 - 3.255

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 5 - 32
 
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Naso thynnoides

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Abesamis, R., Choat, J.H., Clements, K.D., McIlwain, J., Myers, R., Nanola, C., Rocha, L.A., Russell, B. & Stockwell, B.

Reviewer/s
Edgar, G. & Kulbicki, M.

Contributor/s

Justification
Naso thynnoides is widespread in the Indo-Pacific region. It is common and can be locally abundant. It is a targeted food fish in parts of its range and is occasionally seen in fish markets. There may be some localized declines through harvesting, however it is not considered a major threat to the global population. It is found in several Marine Protected Areas within its range. It is therefore listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
Naso thynnoides is generally rare, but several large schools were observed in Milne Bay Province, Papua New Guinea (Allen 2003). Occasional large schools were observed at Raja Ampat, Indonesia (Allen 2003b). It is common and locally abundant in the Philippines (R. Abesamis and C. Nanola pers. comm. 2010).

The catch composition of the Apo Island fishery in the Philippines is dominated by a few fish families, Acanthuridae being one of the five families accounting for about 50-90% of the catch. Reef and reef-associated species became more dominant in the catch over the years. In particular, an increasing proportion of carangids and acanthurids was observed in the catch over time. The proportion of Acanthuridae total catch almost doubled over the study period (16% in 1980/81 to 27% in 2000/2001) (Maypa et al. 2002).

In Kenya, landings during 1978-2001 for families that are less important in commercial catches (e.g., scarinae and Acanthuridae) showed rising catches (1978-1984) followed by a general decline during the 1990s, but the landings for the scarinae showed a rising trend in recent years (Kaunda-Arara et al. 2003).

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
Fishing may cause some localized declines.

Surgeonfishes show varying degrees of habitat preference and utilization of coral reef habitats, with some species spending the majority of their life stages on coral reef while others primarily utilize seagrass beds, mangroves, algal beds, and /or rocky reefs. The majority of surgeonfishes are exclusively found on coral reef habitat, and of these, approximately 80% are experiencing a greater than 30% loss of coral reef area and degradation of coral reef habitat quality across their distributions. However, more research is needed to understand the long-term effects of coral reef habitat loss and degradation on these species' populations. Widespread coral reef loss and declining habitat conditions are particularly worrying for species that recruit into areas with live coral cover, especially as studies have shown that protection of pristine habitats facilitate the persistence of adult populations in species that have spatially separated adult and juvenile habitats (Comeros-Raynal et al. 2012).
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Least Concern (LC)
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no species-specific conservation measures in place for this species. However, its distribution overlaps several marine protected areas within its range.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: commercial; aquarium: commercial
  • Baensch, H.A. and H. Debelius 1997 Meerwasser atlas. Mergus Verlag GmbH, Postfach 86, 49302, Melle, Germany. 1216 p. 3rd edition. (Ref. 27115)
  • Rau, N. and A. Rau 1980 Commercial marine fishes of the Central Philippines (bony fish). German Agency for Technical Cooperation, Germany. 623 pp. (Ref. 393)
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Wikipedia

Naso thynnoides

Naso thynnoides is a tropical fish found in coral reefs in the Pacific and Indian Oceans.[1] It is commonly known as the oneknife unicornfish, oneknife unicorn, thunny unicornfish, singlespine unicornfish, one-spine unicorn, or barred unicornfish.[2] It is of value in commercial fisheries, and is also used in aquaria.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Naso thynnoides at www.fishbase.org.
  2. ^ Common names for Naso thynnoides at www.fishbase.org.


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