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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Juveniles prefer sheltered inner reefs while adults occur in areas of rich coral growth and high vertical relief of lagoon and seaward reefs. Adults semi-silty coastal to about 50 m depth, often seen in pairs (Ref. 48636). Occur solitary or mostly in pairs, are very elusive. Emits loud grunting sounds when harassed. Only the young make excellent aquarium fish (Ref. 4859).
  • Randall, J.E., G.R. Allen and R.C. Steene 1990 Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, Hawaii. 506 p. (Ref. 2334)
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Distribution

Range Description

This species is distributed throughout the Indo-Malayan region to the Solomon Islands and east and west coasts of Australia (including the Rowley Shoals) and New Caledonia (France), north to the Ryukyu Islands (Japan) and Palau (Steene 1978, G.R. Allen pers. comm. 2006, Pyle 2001, R. Pyle pers. comm. 2009). It occurs between 1-60 m in depth.
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Indo-Pacific: Ryukyu Islands to Malaysia and Indonesia to Solomon Islands, south to Australia.
  • Randall, J.E., G.R. Allen and R.C. Steene 1990 Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, Hawaii. 506 p. (Ref. 2334)
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West Pacific and southeastern Indian Ocean.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 13 - 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 18 - 23; Analspines: 3; Analsoft rays: 18 - 19
  • Randall, J.E., G.R. Allen and R.C. Steene 1990 Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, Hawaii. 506 p. (Ref. 2334)
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Size

Maximum size: 460 mm TL
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Max. size

46.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 2334))
  • Randall, J.E., G.R. Allen and R.C. Steene 1990 Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, Hawaii. 506 p. (Ref. 2334)
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Diagnostic Description

Description: Adults yellowish tan with 5 black bars on the sides; scales with blue spots in the middle; head blackish with a white bar behind the eye, running from below the origin of the dorsal fin to the lower edge of the operculum; the caudal and the posterior portions of the dorsal and anal fins with blue spots. Juveniles blackish with about 15 curved narrow blue and white bars on the sides (Ref. 2334). Body depth 1.7-1.9 in SL. Scales longitudinal series 47-50 (Ref. 90102).
  • Randall, J.E., G.R. Allen and R.C. Steene 1990 Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, Hawaii. 506 p. (Ref. 2334)
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Ecology

Habitat

Environment

reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 3 - 60 m (Ref. 90102)
  • Allen, G.R. and M.V. Erdmann 2012 Reef fishes of the East Indies. Perth, Australia: Universitiy of Hawai'i Press, Volumes I-III. Tropical Reef Research. (Ref. 90102)
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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is known from coastal, lagoon and outer reef slopes in clear or murky water. It tends to show a preference for coral-rich areas, especially on steep reef walls. The juveniles are more common on shallower protected reefs (Pyle 2001, G.R. Allen pers. comm. 2006). It feeds on sponges and tunicates. Usually solitary or in pairs (Pyle 2001).

Systems
  • Marine
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Depth range based on 167 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 87 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 2.135 - 74
  Temperature range (°C): 24.782 - 29.205
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.068 - 1.251
  Salinity (PPS): 33.797 - 35.354
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.429 - 4.701
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.079 - 0.232
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.567 - 4.407

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 2.135 - 74

Temperature range (°C): 24.782 - 29.205

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.068 - 1.251

Salinity (PPS): 33.797 - 35.354

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.429 - 4.701

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.079 - 0.232

Silicate (umol/l): 0.567 - 4.407
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Depth: 3 - 50m.
From 3 to 50 meters.

Habitat: reef-associated.
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Trophic Strategy

Occur inshore (Ref. 75154). Juveniles prefer sheltered inner reefs while adults occur in areas of rich coral growth and high vertical relief of lagoon and seaward reefs. Occur mostly in pairs and are very elusive. Emit loud grunting sounds when harassed. Only the young make excellent aquarium fish (Ref. 4859).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pomacanthus sexstriatus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 7
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Pyle, R., Myers, R., Rocha, L.A. & Craig, M.T.

Reviewer/s
Elfes, C., Polidoro, B., Livingstone, S. & Carpenter, K.E.

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern as it is a common species with a relatively wide range and no apparent major threats.
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Population

Population
It is generally common with stable populations.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats

There appear to be no major threats to this species. Collection for the aquarium trade is localized and does not seem to affect the global population.

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Least Concern (LC)
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no species-specific conservation measures in place. Populations are present within several marine protected areas throughout its range.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: subsistence fisheries; aquarium: commercial
  • Blaber, S.J.M., D.T. Brewer and A.N. Harris 1994 Distribution, biomass and community structure of demersal fishes of the Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia. Aust. J. Mar. Freshwat. Res. 45(3):375-396. (Ref. 9700)
  • Steene, R.C. 1978 Butterfly and angelfishes of the world. A.H. & A.W. Reed Pty Ltd., Australia. vol. 1. 144 p. (Ref. 4859)
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Wikipedia

Sixbar angelfish

The sixbar angelfish (Pomacanthus sexstriatus), also known as the six banded angelfish, is a marine angelfish, with an easily recognisable yellow body with black vertical stripes (usually six on each side, hence 'sixbar'), one white vertical stripe on each side of its black head, fluorescent blue spots on the body, fins and tail and fluorescent blue lines on the top and bottom fin and tail. They are common in South Pacific reefs, most commonly the "Great Barrier Reef" of Australia's North-east coast. The sixbar angelfish can grow to a maximum size of 46 cm in the ocean, though only around 30 cm in captivity.

Despite being very sought after by many aquarists, the sixbar angelfish is very difficult to care for. The sixbar angelfish is an omnivore, eating sponges, corals and algae, and is also known to eat other fishes' eggs.

It has been said that this fish was once part of a Micronesian tribe's ancient ritual. The tribe wore the heads of these fish on their hands chanting frantically.[citation needed]

The six-banded angelfish is often seen in pairs, as it mates with one partner and they stay together for life.

References[edit]

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