Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Inhabit deep offshore reefs (Ref. 4858). Rarely seen by divers (Ref. 4858). Oviparous (Ref. 205). Form pairs during breeding (Ref. 205).
  • Allen, G.R., R. Steene and M. Allen 1998 A guide to angelfishes and butterflyfishes. Odyssey Publishing/Tropical Reef Research. 250 p. (Ref. 47838)
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Distribution

Range Description

This species has been recorded from Florida (USA), through the Gulf of Mexico to the Campeche Bank. It has been recorded as a straggler as far north as Cape Hatteras (North Carolina, USA) (Allen 1980, Burgess 2002). It has been recorded at depths between 20 and 200 m (Burgess 2002), but is more common in deeper waters. Most specimens have been collected by trawlers working in deeper waters (Allen 1980).
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Western Atlantic.
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Western Central Atlantic: North Carolina and northeastern Gulf of Mexico to Yucatan in Mexico; unknown in Bahamas and Antilles.
  • Robins, C.R. and G.C. Ray 1986 A field guide to Atlantic coast fishes of North America. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, U.S.A. 354 p. (Ref. 7251)
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 12 - 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17 - 20; Analspines: 3; Analsoft rays: 14 - 16
  • Burgess, W.E. 1978 Butterflyfishes of the world. A monograph of the Family Chaetodontidae. T.F.H. Publications, Neptune City, New Jersey. (Ref. 4855)
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Size

Maximum size: 150 mm TL
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Max. size

15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 7251))
  • Robins, C.R. and G.C. Ray 1986 A field guide to Atlantic coast fishes of North America. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, U.S.A. 354 p. (Ref. 7251)
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Diagnostic Description

Broad dark bar slopes down and backward from middle of spiny dorsal fin to base of rear part of anal fin (Ref. 26938).
  • Burgess, W.E. 1978 Butterflyfishes of the world. A monograph of the Family Chaetodontidae. T.F.H. Publications, Neptune City, New Jersey. (Ref. 4855)
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Type Information

Type for Chaetodon aya
Catalog Number: USNM 37747
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Collector(s): S. Stearns
Locality: Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida, United States, North America
  • Type:
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is normally found in deep subtropical waters. Occurs on rocky slopes of shelf areas and also on soft bottoms. Feeds mostly on small, benthic invertebrates found on reefs and rocks (Burgess 1978, 2002).

Systems
  • Marine
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Depth: 20 - 167m.
From 20 to 167 meters.

Habitat: reef-associated.
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Environment

reef-associated; marine; depth range 20 - 170 m (Ref. 47838), usually 45 - 170 m (Ref. 47838)
  • Allen, G.R., R. Steene and M. Allen 1998 A guide to angelfishes and butterflyfishes. Odyssey Publishing/Tropical Reef Research. 250 p. (Ref. 47838)
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Depth range based on 33 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 17 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 37 - 103.5
  Temperature range (°C): 22.090 - 25.857
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.519 - 4.437
  Salinity (PPS): 36.136 - 36.439
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.119 - 4.657
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.097 - 0.326
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.993 - 2.537

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 37 - 103.5

Temperature range (°C): 22.090 - 25.857

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.519 - 4.437

Salinity (PPS): 36.136 - 36.439

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.119 - 4.657

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.097 - 0.326

Silicate (umol/l): 0.993 - 2.537
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Form pairs during breeding (Ref. 205).
  • Breder, C.M. and D.E. Rosen 1966 Modes of reproduction in fishes. T.F.H. Publications, Neptune City, New Jersey. 941 p. (Ref. 205)
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Prognathodes aya

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Rocha, L.A. & Myers, R.

Reviewer/s
Elfes, C., Polidoro, B., Livingstone, S. & Carpenter, K.E.

Contributor/s

Justification

Listed as Least Concern in view of its relatively wide Caribbean distribution, there are no major threats and because the population is unlikely to be declining.

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Population

Population
There is very little known about the population of this species. However this species may be common as it is recorded as bycatch in trawl fisheries.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats

There appear to be no major threats to this species. Collection is limited and is not considered to be impacting the global population.

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Least Concern (LC)
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions

There appear to be no species-specific conservation measures in place. This species is believed to be present within a number of marine protected areas. It is a poorly-known species with additional research needed.

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

aquarium: commercial
  • Burgess, W.E., H.R. Axelrod and R.E. Hunziker III 1990 Dr. Burgess's atlas of marine aquarium fishes. T.F.H. Publications, Inc., Neptune City, New Jersey. 768 p.
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Wikipedia

Bank Butterflyfish

The Bank Butterflyfish (Prognathodes aya) is a species of butterflyfish found in tropical Atlantic waters.

Description[edit]

It is a silverwhite-colored fish with yellow on all fins except the pectoral fins. It also has vertical dark bars on its eyes and near its caudal fin.

Habitat and range[edit]

The Bank Butterflyfish is uncommon throughout its range. It is found on natural and artificial reefs in Florida, the Gulf of Mexico, and off the Yucatán Peninsula. It is also found North to North Carolina.

References[edit]

  • REEF FISH Identification FLORIDA CARIBBEAN BAHAMAS; Humann, Paul and Ned Deloach; New World Publications Inc., Jacksonville, Fl; pp. 32–33
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