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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Adults inhabit tide pools, lagoons, and outer reef slopes. Found in caves and crevices. Ovoviviparous (Ref. 205). The male carries the eggs in a brood pouch which is found under the tail (Ref. 205). Have been reared in captivity (Ref. 35416).
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Distribution

Range Description

Doryrhamphus dactyliophorus is a pipefish that inhabits tropical and subtropical waters. It is found in the Indo-Pacific region. Its range includes the Red Sea and East Africa in the east to American Samoa in the west (Froese and Pauly 2009). The waters of Japan mark the northern boundary of its range (Matsuda et al. 1984) and it is found in the south as far as Australian waters (Randall et al. 1990, Pogonoski et al. 2002).

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Western Pacific.
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Indo-Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to Samoa, north to Japan (Ref. 559), south to Australia.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 20 - 26; Analspines: 0; Analsoft rays: 4
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Size

Maximum size: 190 mm TL
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Max. size

19.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 4281))
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Diagnostic Description

Usually with one dark band crossing opercle (Ref. 4281).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology

A marine species associated with coral reefs (Belmaker et al. 2007), D. dactyliophorus is found in pairs or occasionally in large groups (Kuiter 2000), although aggregations may be composed of juveniles (Kuiter 1996, cited by Pogonoski et al. 2002, p. 136). Males start brooding at 90 mm standard length (Dawson 1985) and eggs are carried on the underside of the abdomen.

Doryrhamphus dactyliophorus is found at depths between five and 56 m. It has also has been observed to live in caves and crevices (Kuiter 2000). This species is found with cleaner shrimps and is assumed to perform some role in cleaning other fishes (Kuiter 2000, Pogonoski et al. 2002).


Systems
  • Marine
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Depth: 5 - 56m.
From 5 to 56 meters.

Habitat: reef-associated. Valid as *Dunckerocampus dactyliophorus* fide Kuiter 2000 who is revising this family (Note from Barry Hutchins). DAP Notes: found in Indonesia - Not South Africa - see *Dunckerocampus boylei* Kate Moots also supports *Dunckerocampus dactyliophorus*
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Environment

reef-associated; brackish; marine; depth range 5 - 56 m (Ref. 1602)
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Depth range based on 71 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 41 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1 - 42.65
  Temperature range (°C): 25.689 - 29.336
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.019 - 1.118
  Salinity (PPS): 32.019 - 35.346
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.271 - 4.812
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.071 - 0.415
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.721 - 5.501

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 1 - 42.65

Temperature range (°C): 25.689 - 29.336

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.019 - 1.118

Salinity (PPS): 32.019 - 35.346

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.271 - 4.812

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.071 - 0.415

Silicate (umol/l): 0.721 - 5.501
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Trophic Strategy

Inhabits tidepools, lagoons, and outer reef slopes. Found in caves and crevices (Ref. 1602), and in rock-like and coral reefs (Ref. 9137). Feeds on small crustaceans and fish larvae (Ref. 9137).
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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Male carries the eggs in a brood pouch (Ref. 205).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Dunckerocampus dactyliophorus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Dunckerocampus dactyliophorus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 6
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Sorensen, M. & Vincent, A.

Reviewer/s
Curtis, J. & O’Donnell, K.

Contributor/s

Justification

This species is assessed as Data Deficient as there is no information available that provides estimates of population size or exploitation levels. More study is needed to accurately determine its taxonomic and conservation status. A listing of Data Deficient does not imply that the taxon is not threatened, but instead that not enough information exists to estimate extinction risk. Application of the category Data Deficient is a call for more research and scrutiny to be directed at this species.

The data available currently for this species is restricted to distribution, taxonomy, and some life history parameters. Although this species is captured live for the marine ornamental trade, little information is available regarding the volumes of animals that make up the trade.


History
  • 1996
    Data Deficient
    (Baillie and Groombridge 1996)
  • 1996
    Data Deficient
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Population

Population

There is little information available regarding the population sizes or trends of D. dactyliophorus for its entire known geographic range. Within Australian jurisdictional waters population declines are not suspected (Pogonoski et al. 2002), however no information is available for regions where D. dactyliophorus is caught for the aquarium trade, such as Indonesia and the Philippines (Paulus 1999, Reksodihardjo-Lilley and Lilley 2007).


Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats

There is little information on direct threats to this species, other than the removal of wild individuals for the aquarium trade. There are no catch or trade volume estimates for D. dactyliophorus available.

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Data deficient (DD)
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions

Public aquariums have had D. dactyliophorus in their collections but not many aquariums actively raise this species in captivity (Koldewey 2005) and commercial breeding of pipefish for sale to aquarists is rare (Seahorse Sanctuary 2008).

This species is found or suspected to occur in the following Australian marine protected areas: Ashmore Reef National Nature Reserve, Western Australia, Cartier Island Marine Protected Area, off northern WA (unconfirmed), Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and World Heritage Area, Queensland, and Rowley Shoals Marine Park, Western Australia (Pogonoski et al. 2002).

In Australia, this species has been subject to the export controls of the Commonwealth Wildlife Protection (Regulation of Exports and Imports) Act 1982 since 1 January 1998 and is listed as a marine species under section 248 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Pogonoski et al. 2002).

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

aquarium: public aquariums
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Wikipedia

Banded pipefish

The banded pipefish or ringed pipefish (Dunckerocampus dactyliophorus) is a species of fish in the Syngnathidae (seahorses and pipefish) family.[2]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

The banded pipefish is widespread throughout the tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific region, Red Sea included.[3] Its range includes Australia, Fiji, French Polynesia, Indonesia, Japan, the Marshall Islands, New Caledonia, Northern Mariana Islands, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Samoa, the Solomon Islands, South Africa, and Taiwan.[4] It inhabits tide pools, lagoons, and outer reef slopes in tropical climates.[5]

Description[edit]

The banded pipefish has a straight, elongated body which reaches a maximum length of 19 cm (7.4 in).[5] It has fleshy streams coming back from its head, trailing sometimes metres behind the fish itself. These trails are thought to be mechanisms of camouflage for the pipefish whilst hiding in reeds.[6]

Reproduction[edit]

Similar to other seahorses and pipefishes, the male banded pipefish is equipped with a specialised brood pouch, rather than the female.[7] The female deposits her eggs in the male's pouch, where they develop. The male later gives birth.[8]

In captivity[edit]

Banded pipefish are often kept by aquarists. They generally will eat brine shrimp in captivity. The ideal water conditions for this fish is 24-25°C or 75-77°F and a pH of 8.1-8.3.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sorensen, M. & Vincent, A. 2010. Doryrhamphus dactyliophorus. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.1. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 17 October 2013.
  2. ^ "Fish.gov.au". Archived from the original on 22 July 2008. Retrieved 10 July 2008. 
  3. ^ http://www.fishbase.org/summary/5972
  4. ^ Vincent, A. 1996. Doryrhamphus dactyliophorus. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 4 August 2007.
  5. ^ a b Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2008). "Dunckerocampus dactyliophorus" in FishBase. 02 2008 version.
  6. ^ Berghaus, Günter (2004). New Perspectives on Prehistoric Art. Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN 0-275-97813-3. 
  7. ^ Encyclopedia of the Aquatic World. Marshall Cavendish. 2004. ISBN 0-7614-7418-8. 
  8. ^ Blasiola, George C.; Matthew M. Vriends (2000). The Saltwater Aquarium Handbook. Barron's Educational Series. ISBN 0-7641-1241-4. 
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