Overview

Comprehensive Description

Boops boops ZBK (Linnaeus, 1758)

Mediterranean Sea : 14600-316 (6 spc.), 13.02.1968 , Mersin Bay , trawl , M. Demir .

  • Nurettin Meriç, Lütfiye Eryilmaz, Müfit Özulug (2007): A catalogue of the fishes held in the Istanbul University, Science Faculty, Hydrobiology Museum. Zootaxa 1472, 29-54: 45-45, URL:http://www.zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:428F3980-C1B8-45FF-812E-0F4847AF6786
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Biology

Found on the shelf or coastal pelagic on various bottoms (sand, mud, rocks and seaweeds). Gregarious, ascending to the surface mainly at night. Omnivorous, feeding mainly on crustaceans, also planktophagous. Hermaphroditic, generally protogynous. Also caught in pelagic trawls (Ref. 9987). Utilized fresh and frozen; consumed pan-fried, broiled and baked (Ref. 9987).
  • Bauchot, M.-L. and J.-C. Hureau 1990 Sparidae. p. 790-812. In J.C. Quero, J.C. Hureau, C. Karrer, A. Post and L. Saldanha (eds.) Check-list of the fishes of the eastern tropical Atlantic (CLOFETA). JNICT, Lisbon; SEI, Paris; and UNESCO, Paris. Vol. 2. (Ref. 3688)
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Distribution

Eastern Atlantic: Norway to Angola, including the Canary Islands, Cape Verde, and the Sao Tome-Principe Islands. Common from Bay of Biscay to Gibraltar (Ref. 4781). Also found in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea.
  • Bauchot, M.-L. and J.-C. Hureau 1990 Sparidae. p. 790-812. In J.C. Quero, J.C. Hureau, C. Karrer, A. Post and L. Saldanha (eds.) Check-list of the fishes of the eastern tropical Atlantic (CLOFETA). JNICT, Lisbon; SEI, Paris; and UNESCO, Paris. Vol. 2. (Ref. 3688)
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Western Baltic Sea, North Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea, Eastern Atlantic: Norway to Angola including Madeira and Canary Islands.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 13 - 15; Dorsal soft rays (total): 12 - 16; Analspines: 3; Analsoft rays: 14 - 16
  • Muus, B.J. and J.G. Nielsen 1999 Sea fish. Scandinavian Fishing Year Book, Hedehusene, Denmark. 340 p. (Ref. 35388)
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Size

Maximum size: 360 mm ---
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Max. size

36.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 3397))
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Diagnostic Description

Body slender, with 3 - 5 weak, golden longitudinal stripes and a black spot at the pectoral fin base (Ref. 35388).
  • Muus, B.J. and J.G. Nielsen 1999 Sea fish. Scandinavian Fishing Year Book, Hedehusene, Denmark. 340 p. (Ref. 35388)
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Ecology

Habitat

Environment

demersal; oceanodromous (Ref. 51243); marine; depth range 0 - 350 m (Ref. 26999), usually 0 - 100 m (Ref. 26999)
  • Riede, K. 2004 Global register of migratory species - from global to regional scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. Federal Agency for Nature Conservation, Bonn, Germany. 329 p. (Ref. 51243)
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Depth range based on 555 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 233 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1.5 - 276
  Temperature range (°C): 11.687 - 19.658
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.432 - 8.361
  Salinity (PPS): 35.415 - 38.739
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.275 - 5.734
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.091 - 0.553
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.178 - 4.827

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 1.5 - 276

Temperature range (°C): 11.687 - 19.658

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.432 - 8.361

Salinity (PPS): 35.415 - 38.739

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.275 - 5.734

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.091 - 0.553

Silicate (umol/l): 1.178 - 4.827
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Depth: 0 - 300m.
Recorded at 300 meters.

Habitat: demersal.
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Migration

Oceanodromous. Migrating within oceans typically between spawning and different feeding areas, as tunas do. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
  • Riede, K. 2004 Global register of migratory species - from global to regional scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. Federal Agency for Nature Conservation, Bonn, Germany. 329 p. (Ref. 51243)
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Trophic Strategy

Found on the shelf or coastal pelagic on various bottoms (sand, mud, rocks and seaweeds). Gregarious, ascending to the surface mainly at night. Omnivorous, feeding mainly on crustaceans, also planktonophagous.
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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Conflicting descriptions of the reproductive style of this species have been reported, Ref. 34225 describe this species as being a gonochorist (Ref. 28504).
  • Bauchot, M.-L. and J.-C. Hureau 1986 Sparidae. p. 883-907. In P.J.P. Whitehead, M.-L. Bauchot, J.-C. Hureau, J. Nielsen and E. Tortonese (eds.) Fishes of the north-eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean. volume 2. UNESCO, Paris. (Ref. 4781)
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Boops boops

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Boops boops

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 33
Specimens with Barcodes: 53
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Threats

Not Evaluated
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: highly commercial; gamefish: yes; bait: usually; price category: high; price reliability: reliable: based on ex-vessel price for this species
  • Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations 1992 FAO yearbook 1990. Fishery statistics. Catches and landings. FAO Fish. Ser. (38). FAO Stat. Ser. 70:(105):647 p. (Ref. 4931)
  • Schneider, W. 1990 FAO species identification sheets for fishery purposes. Field guide to the commercial marine resources of the Gulf of Guinea. Prepared and published with the support of the FAO Regional Office for Africa. Rome: FAO. 268 p. (Ref. 2683)
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Wikipedia

Boops boops

Boops boops, called the bogue, is a species of seabream native to the eastern Atlantic.[1] Its scientific name (pronounced /ˈboʊ.ɒps/) comes from Greek βόωψ (boōps, literally "cow-eye") and refers to its large ("bug") eyes, as does its common name in many languages. It is found off the coasts of Europe, Africa, the Azores and the Canary Islands, from Norway to Angola, and in the Mediterranean and Black Seas. The species avoids brackish waters such as the Baltic Sea. A demersal and semi-pelagic feeder, it can generally be found down to 100 m, and infrequently down to 350 m. It consumes seaweed, crustaceans, and some plankton, in schools that rise to the surface at night. Individuals can reach 36 cm, but average 20 cm.

Sex determination in Boops boops is unclear. It has variously been described as a rudimentary intersex organism, with a few intersex individuals, or a protogynic intersex, with individuals starting out life as females, and some becoming male later on.

Boops boops for sale in Turkey

It is commercially fished, with 37,830 t taken in 2008.[1] When cleaned and pan fried, broiled or baked fresh, they are good tasting, but when stored their gut flora soon spread unpleasant flavors to their flesh.[2] Much of the catch is used for fishmeal or tuna fishing bait.

Parasites[edit]

Bogue are host to a wide variety of parasites, ranging from metazoans such as Digenean flatworms, Acanthocephalan spiny-headed worms, nematode roundworms, isopod and copepod crustaceans and Myxozoan cnidarians to the unicellular dinoflagellate Ichthyodinium chabelardi, a parasite that is lethal to eggs developing in ovaries. At least 67 metazoan parasite species have been reported from Boops boops, and their community structures are well studied by scientists.[3] For example, in the aftermath of the 2002 Prestige oil spill the community of parasitic species inhabiting bogue caught off the coast of Spain was found to be noticeably altered.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Boops boops". Fisheries Global Information System. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Retrieved 16 January 2011. 
  2. ^ "Chemical and sensory changes associated with microbial flora of Mediterranean Boque (Boops boops) stored aerobically at 0, 3, 7, and 10°C". Applied and Environmental Microbiology (American Society for Microbiology) 65 (2): 698–706. 1999. 
  3. ^ Olmo, Ana Pérez-del; Fernández, Mercedes; Gibson, David I.; Raga, Juan Antonio; Kostadinova, Aneta. "Descriptions of some unusual digeneans from Boops boops L. (Sparidae) and a complete checklist of its metazoan parasites". Systematic Parasitology (Springer) 66 (2): 137–157. doi:10.1007/s11230-006-9063-5. 
  4. ^ Pérez-del Olmo, A.; Raga, J.A.; Kostadinova, A.; Fernández, M. (2007). "Parasite communities in Boops boops (L.) (Sparidae) after the Prestige oil-spill: Detectable alterations". Marine Pollution Bulletin (Elsevier) 54 (3): 266–276. doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2006.10.003. 
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