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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology/Natural History: Spends much the time motionless or slowly pulsing the bell while drifting with tentacles extended 10-20 feet or more. Feeds on gelatinous zooplankton, especially other medusae. Usually with symbiotic amphipods on the subumbrella and juvenile crabs on the exumbrella, including Cancer gracilis. Also hosts the barnacle Alepas pacifica and juvenile fishes. Has only a mild sting. In the life cycle, fertilized eggs develop into ciliated planula larvae which swim, then settle and metamorphose into scyphistomae polyps. Mature scyphistomae had 30-44 tentacles and reproduce asexually by side budding as well as strobilating to produce ephyrae which grew up into mature medusae. In the laboratory it took about 9 months for an ephyra to grow into a mature medusa.

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© Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory

Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Bell to 60 cm in diameter, with 16 clusters of tentacles, slightly inside the bell margin, each containing a single row of tentacles. With 16 lappets and 16 rhopalia. Oral arms relatively short and massively folded. Central gonadal mass yellow, with surrounding clear to whitish or pale yellow bell, oral arms and tentacles, resembling a raw egg; small individuals often colorless or milky white
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© Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory

Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Distribution

lower St. Lawrence estuary to Cape Cod
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Geographical Range: Worldwide; on the western United States coast from Alaska to southern California.

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© Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory

Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Physical Description

Look Alikes

How to Distinguish from Similar Species: Cyanea capillata is similar but P. camtschatica can be identified by a transparent margin consisting of 16 large lobes that alternate with smaller lobes.
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© Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory

Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Ecology

Habitat

upper epipelagic
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Depth range based on 78 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 77 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 167.98
  Temperature range (°C): 8.622 - 19.900
  Nitrate (umol/L): 1.046 - 26.169
  Salinity (PPS): 33.344 - 35.434
  Oxygen (ml/l): 2.414 - 5.860
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.251 - 2.161
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.982 - 34.422

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 167.98

Temperature range (°C): 8.622 - 19.900

Nitrate (umol/L): 1.046 - 26.169

Salinity (PPS): 33.344 - 35.434

Oxygen (ml/l): 2.414 - 5.860

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.251 - 2.161

Silicate (umol/l): 2.982 - 34.422
 
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Depth Range: Pelagic

Habitat: In temperate oceans.

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Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Wikipedia

Phacellophora camtschatica

Phacellophora camtschatica, known as the fried egg jellyfish or egg-yolk jellyfish, is a very large jellyfish, with a bell up to 60 cm (2 ft) in diameter and sixteen clusters of up to a few dozen tentacles, each up to 6 meters (20 ft) long. This cool-water species can be found in many parts of the world's oceans. It feeds mostly on smaller jellyfish and other gelatinous zooplankton, which become ensnared in the tentacles (Strand & Hamner, 1988). Because the sting of this jellyfish is so weak, many small crustaceans, including larval crabs (Cancer gracilis) and Amphipoda, regularly ride on its bell and even steal food from its oral arms and tentacles (Towanda & Thuesen, 2006). The life cycle of this jellyfish is well known (Widmer 2006), because it is kept in culture at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. It alternates between a benthic stage that is attached to rocks and piers that reproduces asexually and the planktonic stage that reproduces sexually in the water column; there are both males and females in the plankton.

A smaller jellyfish, Cotylorhiza tuberculata, typically found in warmer water, particularly in the Mediterranean Sea, is also popularly called a fried egg jellyfish.

References

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