Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Dutch (1) (learn more)

Overview

Brief Summary

The ringed tubularia looks somewhat like a small bouquet of pink flowers. A colony consists of a bushy bunch of stems, each ending with a polyp with tentacles. Ringed tubularia reproduce in two ways. Small jellyfish-like organisms reproduce sexually while attached to the ends of the stems. New polyps hatch immediately out of the eggs. The second manner is asexual: loose pieces of the colony are carried by the sea current and can 'take root' at a new location.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Copyright Ecomare

Source: Ecomare

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Comprehensive Description

Attached to fixed objects but frequently developing into a free-living, detached colony as the result of fragmentation of the original colony. Monoecious or dioecious colonies. The eggs develop inside the female gonophore and become free in the actinula stage. As the possibilities for dispersion of the actinulae are limited many settle on or in the vicinity of the elder.
  • CALDER D.R. & W. VERVOORT (1998) Zool. Verh., Leiden 319: 3-65.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

This hydroid forms neat rounded masses of large pink polyps. The stems are tubular, with a yellowish coloured tegument and are branched at the base. The polyp colour is pale pink through to red, and consists of a central circlet of oral tentacles surrounded by paler but larger aboral tentacles. Overall height 40-60mm, diameter of the polyp and tentacles about 10mm. Tubularia indivisa can be difficult to distinguish from this species and the two often occur together. In Tubularia larynx the stems branch, while in Tubularia indivisa they are unbranched, though separate individuals settle on the stems of others forming irregular clumps.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© National Museums Northern Ireland and its licensors

Source: Encyclopedia of Marine Life of Britain and Ireland

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

General Description

Stems increasingly gradually in diameter distally to 0.5 cm. Perisarc thick, smooth with groups of 3-8 annulations; regrowth of broken stems beginning with a new set of annulations. Hydranth 1.2 mm long, 1 mm wide but tentacles not fully extended. Proximal whorl of tentacles a little longer than distal. Gonophores small, spherical, clustered between whorls of tentacles.

Color: Tentacles white, gonophores pink.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Watson, Jeanette

Source: Cnidaria Lifedesk

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

This species is common in the British isles, in the seas surrounding Great Britain, and in the Americas (Murphy, 1967).

Biogeographic Regions: atlantic ocean (Native )

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Menez Gwen. Sub-arctic, temperate and subtropical waters of the northern Atlantic, from the littoral zone down to considerable depth in the bathyal zone.
  • CALDER D.R. & W. VERVOORT (1998) Zool. Verh., Leiden 319: 3-65.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Common throughout the British Isles.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© National Museums Northern Ireland and its licensors

Source: Encyclopedia of Marine Life of Britain and Ireland

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Like all Cnidarians, this species is radially symmetrical, has no anus, and has tissue level of organization (Banister & Campbell 1985). The Tubularia has both polyp and medusa stages; however, the medusa remain attached to the polyp parent. That is to say, there is no free-living medusa form. Turbularia larynx is a very small animal, with a total length of about 2-3cm. It has two distinct rings of tentacles, one around its mouth and the other at the base of the head. In between these two rings, are the gonophores, or the sexual buds of the animal. These animals are very rich in color, usually a pink or red (Murphy, 1967).

Other Physical Features: ectothermic ; radial symmetry

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Colonies formed by branched hydrocauli or by development of actinulae on individual hydrocauli arising from creeping, twisted stolon with wrinkled, straw-coloured perisarc attached to fixed objects. Diameter of hydrocaulus about 400 Ìm, perisarc firm basally, gradually thinning about distally and terminating just below bulbous base of terminal, vasiform hydranth. Height of hydranth about 1.7 mm, width 1.2 m; one whorl of short oral tentacles, up to 750 ?m long and one whorl of much longer aboral tentacles, up to 2.800 ?m long. Gonophores fixed sporosacs, developing just above insertion of aboral tentacles on short, slender dichotomously branches blastostyles. Both male and female gonophores are eumedusoid without remnants of radial canals but with three rudimentary tentacles. Nematocysts: Desmonemes 3.8-4.6 x 3.0 x 3.6 ?m; small stenoteles 6.7-7.3 x 5.4-5.7 mm; large stenoteles 10.6- 21.1 x 9.5-10.1 ?m; mastigophores 8.4-9.6 x 3.5-4.0 ?m; O-isorhiras 9.2-9.4 x 8.4-8.7 ?m.
  • CALDER D.R. & W. VERVOORT (1998) Zool. Verh., Leiden 319: 3-65.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Size

Height of individual polyps up to 50 mm.
  • CALDER D.R. & W. VERVOORT (1998) Zool. Verh., Leiden 319: 3-65.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

This species is usually found attached to floating buoys, mussel shells, rocks, rocky hangovers, and seaweed at low tide (Nichols, 1971). They can also be found on harbor pins and sunken rope (Grzimek, 1972). These are found in strong currents. Tubularia are rarely found alone, but almost always found in colonies of other hydroids (Murphy, 1967).

Habitat Regions: saltwater or marine

Aquatic Biomes: coastal

  • Grzimek, B. 1972. Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia, Volume 1 Lower Animals. New York: Von Nostrand Reinhold Company.
  • Murphy, R. 1967. The Larousse Encyclopedia of Animal Life. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.
  • Nichols, D. 1971. The Oxford Book of Invertebrates. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Depth range based on 5 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 1 sample.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 31.09
  Temperature range (°C): 7.263 - 7.263
  Nitrate (umol/L): 4.207 - 4.207
  Salinity (PPS): 32.468 - 32.468
  Oxygen (ml/l): 6.765 - 6.765
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.629 - 0.629
  Silicate (umol/l): 3.372 - 3.372

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 31.09
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Depth range based on 107 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 23 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 855
  Temperature range (°C): 6.695 - 11.785
  Nitrate (umol/L): 3.003 - 18.490
  Salinity (PPS): 33.852 - 35.403
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.494 - 6.665
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.380 - 1.121
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.147 - 11.000

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 855

Temperature range (°C): 6.695 - 11.785

Nitrate (umol/L): 3.003 - 18.490

Salinity (PPS): 33.852 - 35.403

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.494 - 6.665

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.380 - 1.121

Silicate (umol/l): 2.147 - 11.000
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

This hydroid is usually found on rocks and attached to algae in moderate to strong tidal streams. It is commonest in shallow water, fouling piers and the undersides of boats, down to 25m or more in strong tidal streams.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© National Museums Northern Ireland and its licensors

Source: Encyclopedia of Marine Life of Britain and Ireland

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Trophic Strategy

Because there are no free-living medusa and the dominant stage is a polyp, the tentacles of the Tubularia are used to gather food from the water. Most of the food gathered is plankton and sediment in the water (Coleman 1991).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

During the summer time, swimming sperm are released into the water and attracted to female reproductive structures by means of a chemical substance. Internal fertilization occurs in the female medusoids. The fertilized eggs develop into actinula (Murphy, 1967). These larvae develop directly into a new polyp (Ricketts, et al 1948). So, although the medusa are attached to the polyp, the life cycle resembles the typical Cnidarian one with the polyp reproducing asexually and the medusa producing egg and sperm.

Parental Investment: no parental involvement

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Ectopleura larynx

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

There are no negative effects of this species on human beings, except for the possible negative effects of their presence as they anchor themselves on solid objects in the water. This would probably be more of a problem with aesthetics.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

There are no positive effects of this species on human beings.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!