Ecology

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Rigidoporus ulmarius is saprobic on dead, white-rotted stump (large) of Ulmus
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Rigidoporus ulmarius is saprobic on dead, white-rotted stump (large) of Aesculus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Rigidoporus ulmarius is saprobic on dead, white-rotted stump of Acer negundo

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Rigidoporus ulmarius is saprobic on dead, white-rotted stump (large) of Acer pseudoplatanus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Rigidoporus ulmarius is saprobic on dead, white-rotted stump (large) of Fagus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Rigidoporus ulmarius is saprobic on dead, white-rotted stump (large) of Fraxinus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Rigidoporus ulmarius is saprobic on dead, white-rotted stump (large) of Platanus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Rigidoporus ulmarius is saprobic on dead, white-rotted stump (large) of Populus nigra

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Rigidoporus ulmarius is saprobic on dead, white-rotted stump (large) of Robinia pseudoacacia

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Rigidoporus ulmarius is saprobic on dead, white-rotted stump of Sambucus nigra

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Rigidoporus ulmarius is saprobic on dead, white-rotted stump of Sambucus racemosa

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Rigidoporus ulmarius is saprobic on dead, white-rotted stump (large) of Tilia

Foodplant / parasite
fruitbody of Rigidoporus ulmarius parasitises live trunk (large) of Populus alba x tremula (P. x canescens)

Fungus / saprobe
fruitbody of Trechispora cohaerens is saprobic on dead, decayed bracket of Rigidoporus ulmarius
Other: major host/prey

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Wikipedia

Rigidoporus ulmarius

Rigidoporus ulmarius is a plant pathogen found mainly on broad-leaved trees. It used to be very common on elm.

The fruiting bodies are white, knobbly and relatively hard, requiring a fair amount of force to break. Older bodies may be covered with green algae, or partially covered with vegetation and leaves making them difficult to spot. They often encapsulate grass, twigs and other debris.[citation needed]

Tubes are 1–5 mm long in each layer, pinkish to orange when young, browning with age, each layer separated by a thin contrasting band of white flesh. Pores 5–8 per millimeter, red-orange fading to clay-pink or buff with age. Spores pale yellow, globose, 6–7.5 µm in diameter. Hyphal structure monomitic; generative hyphae lacking clamps. Habitat at the base of trunks of deciduous trees, usually elm. Season all year, perennial. Common. Not edible. Found in Europe.[citation needed]

A fruit body of R. ulmarius discovered in Kew Gardens in 2003 was, for a time, the largest known fungal fruit body ever discovered, measuring 150 by 133 centimetres (59 by 52 in) in diameter, and had a circumference of 425 centimetres (167 in). However, in 2011, a specimen of Phellinus ellipsoideus (formerly Fomitiporia ellipsoidea) significantly larger was discovered in China.[1]

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