Overview

Brief Summary

Introduction

Introduction:

The genus Polygonia is holarctic.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

Leptree.net

Source: LepTree

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Introduction

The genus Polygonia is holarctic. The adult wings have strongly crenulated margins with brownish patterns on the underside that render the butterflies virtually invisible when they land on dead leaves. Several species, such as P. interrogationis, overwinter as adults and may be seen flying in the early spring before any leaves are present on the trees.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Evolution and Systematics

Evolution

Discussion of Phylogenetic Relationships

View Polygonia Tree

The topology is based on the combined analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial genes by Wahlberg et al. (2009, their Fig. 1). There is some conflict between topologies implied by the mtDNA in contrast to the nuclear genes, but this tree represents the most parsimonious arrangement of the taxa based on all the data available, and therefore the preferred hypothesis of relationships for the time being.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:637
Specimens with Sequences:624
Specimens with Barcodes:610
Species:21
Species With Barcodes:20
Public Records:358
Public Species:19
Public BINs:9
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Polygonia

P. c-album showing angular wings and typical comma marking

Polygonia (from Greek πολύς - polys, "many"[1] and γωνία - gōnia, "angle"[2]) is a genus of butterflies with a conspicuous white mark on the underside of each hindwing, hence the common name Comma. They also have conspicuous angular notches on the outer edges of their forewings, hence the other common name Anglewing butterflies. The related genus Nymphalis also includes some anglewing species; Polygonia is sometimes classified as a subgenus of Nymphalis.[3]

Many members of Polygonia hibernate as adults. Species include:[4][5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ πολύς, Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon, on Perseus
  2. ^ γωνία, Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon, on Perseus
  3. ^ Nymphalis. funet.fi
  4. ^ Polygonia, Tree of Life
  5. ^ Wahlberg, N. et al. (2009). Timing major conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear genes in species relationships of Polygonia butterflies (Nymphalidae: Nymphalini). BMC Evolutionary Biology 9:92.

References[edit]

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!