Overview

Brief Summary

Introduction

The genus Vanessa contains some of the world's most widespread and familiar butterflies, including the Red Admiral (V. atalanta) and the Painted Lady (V. cardui).

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Evolution and Systematics

Evolution

Discussion of Phylogenetic Relationships

View Vanessa Tree

The topology is based on the molecular phylogenetic study of Wahlberg et al. (2005).

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 465
Specimens with Sequences: 435
Specimens with Barcodes: 420
Species: 20
Species With Barcodes: 20
Public Records: 159
Public Species: 20
Public BINs: 20
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Vanessa (butterfly)

Vanessa is a genus of brush-footed butterflies. Many people are familiar with it, as it has a near-global distribution and includes conspicuous species such as the red admirals (e.g., Red Admiral, Indian Red Admiral, New Zealand Red Admiral), the Kamehameha, and the painted ladies of subgenus Cynthia: Painted Lady, American Painted Lady, Vanessa Annabella or West Coast Lady, Australian Painted Lady, etc. For African Admirals see genus, Antanartia. Recently several members traditionally considered to be in the genus Antanartia have been determined to belong within the genus Vanessa.[1]

The name of the genus may have been taken from the girl's name. Though it has been suggested the name may be a variant of "Phanessa", from the name of an Ancient Greek deity, this is unlikely. The name of the deity is actually not "Phanessa" but Phanes. Johan Christian Fabricius, the entomologist who named this genus, normally used the original forms of the names of classical divinities when he created new scientific names.

In popular culture[edit]

John Shade discusses the Vanessa genus in reference to his wife in Nabokov's Pale Fire.[2]

Species[edit]

There are 22 species, arranged here alphabetically.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wahlberg, Niklas; Rubinoff, Daniel (2011). "Vagility across Vanessa (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): mobility in butterfly species does not inhibit the formation and persistence of isolated sister taxa.". Systematic Entomology 36 (2): 362–370. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3113.2010.00566.x. 
  2. ^ Nabokov, Vladimir (1992) Pale Fire. New York: Everyman's Library 133
  3. ^ Wahlberg, Niklas; Rubinoff, Daniel (2011). "Vagility across Vanessa (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): mobility in butterfly species does not inhibit the formation and persistence of isolated sister taxa.". Systematic Entomology 36 (2): 362–370. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3113.2010.00566.x. 
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