Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 13154 specimens in 4 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 1278 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 0
  Temperature range (°C): -1.109 - 16.316
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.240 - 10.275
  Salinity (PPS): 6.218 - 35.391
  Oxygen (ml/l): 5.685 - 9.084
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.231 - 1.130
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.565 - 12.889

Graphical representation

Temperature range (°C): -1.109 - 16.316

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.240 - 10.275

Salinity (PPS): 6.218 - 35.391

Oxygen (ml/l): 5.685 - 9.084

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.231 - 1.130

Silicate (umol/l): 0.565 - 12.889
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Associations

Known predators

Cepphus (guillemots) is prey of:
Alopex lagopus

Based on studies in:
Norway: Spitsbergen (Coastal)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • V. S. Summerhayes and C. S. Elton, Contributions to the ecology of Spitsbergen and Bear Island, J. Ecol. 11:214-286, from p. 232 (1923).
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Known prey organisms

Cepphus (guillemots) preys on:
Animalia
Copepoda
Boreogadus saida

Based on studies in:
Norway: Spitsbergen (Coastal)
Canada, high Arctic (Ice cap)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • M. S. W. Bradstreet and W. E. Cross, Trophic relationships at High Arctic ice edges, Arctic 3(1)5:1-12, from p. 9 (1982).
  • V. S. Summerhayes and C. S. Elton, Contributions to the ecology of Spitsbergen and Bear Island, J. Ecol. 11:214-286, from p. 232 (1923).
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Evolution and Systematics

Functional Adaptations

Functional adaptation

Egg shape prevents falls: guillemots
 

Eggs of marine birds, Guillemots, don’t fall off rocky cliffs because their pear shape causes them to spin on the spot rather than roll, returning them to equilibrium.

   
  "Some marine birds, such as the guillemot, which lives in northern seas, lay their pear-shaped eggs without the shelter of a nest directly onto the bare windy rock ledge of the rookery. The center of gravity is far from the center of the egg. When the egg starts to roll on the sloping rock, it goes into a curved course and returns all by itself to a position of equilibrium. By its own dynamics, the egg protects itself from falling off. Presumably, all those guillemot eggs that did not have this property were destroyed." (Tributsch 1984:22)
  Learn more about this functional adaptation.
  • Tributsch, H. 1984. How life learned to live. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. 218 p.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:25
Specimens with Sequences:24
Specimens with Barcodes:24
Species:3
Species With Barcodes:3
Public Records:24
Public Species:3
Public BINs:2
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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Cepphus

Cepphus is a genus of seabirds in the auk family also referred to as true guillemots or, in North America, simply as guillemots. These are medium-sized birds with mainly black plumage in the breeding season, thin dark bills and red legs and feet. Two species have white wing patches, the third has white facial “spectacles”. They are much paler in winter plumage, mottled above and white below.

The breeding habitat is rocky shores and islands on the coasts of the northern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. They usually lay their eggs in rocky sites near water.

These birds may overwinter in their breeding areas, moving to open waters if necessary, but usually not migrating very far south.

They dive for food from the surface, swimming underwater. They mainly eat fish and crustaceans, also some molluscs, insects and plant material.

The species are:

There are also fossil forms

  • Cepphus olsoni (San Luis Rey River Late Miocene - Early Pliocene of W USA)
  • Cepphus cf. columba (Lawrence Canyon Early Pliocene of W USA)
  • Cepphus cf. grylle (San Diego Late Pliocene, W USA)

The latter two resemble the extant species, but because of the considerable distance in time or space from their current occurrence may represent distinct species.

References[edit]

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