Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (1) (learn more)

Ecology

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Pholiota aurivella is saprobic on live branch (upper) of Fagus
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Pholiota aurivella is saprobic on dead, fallen, decayed trunk (large) of Alnus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Pholiota aurivella is saprobic on dead, fallen, decayed trunk (large) of Betula

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Pholiota aurivella is saprobic on dead, fallen, decayed trunk of Corylus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Pholiota aurivella is saprobic on dead, fallen, decayed trunk (large) of Fraxinus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Pholiota aurivella is saprobic on dead, fallen, decayed trunk (large) of Populus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Pholiota aurivella is saprobic on dead, fallen, decayed trunk (large) of Ulmus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Pholiota aurivella is saprobic on dead, fallen, decayed trunk (large) of Quercus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Pholiota aurivella is saprobic on dead, fallen, decayed wood of Sambucus nigra
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Pholiota aurivella is saprobic on dead, fallen, decayed trunk (large) of Acer rubrum

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Pholiota aurivella is saprobic on live branch (upper) of Salix

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Pholiota aurivella

Pholiota aurivella is a species of fungus in the family Strophariaceae that is found in native forest of New Zealand[2] and in the United States. It is frequently found in the American West and Southwest, especially in late Summer and Fall. Some books list it as edible,[3] but David Arora lists its edibility as "to be avoided."[4] It is sticky or slimy when moist and grows in clusters on live or dead trees.[4][3]

References

  1. ^ "Pholiota aurivella (Batsch) P. Kumm. 1871". MycoBank. International Mycological Association. Retrieved 2013-04-06. 
  2. ^ "Species: Pholiota aurivella". The Hidden Forest. Retrieved 10 June 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Bessette, Alan E. (1997). Mushrooms of Northeastern North America. Syracuse, New York: Syracuse University Press. ISBN 0815603886. 
  4. ^ a b Arora, David (1986). Mushrooms Demystified. Berkeley, California: Ten Speed Press. pp. 390–1. ISBN 0898151694. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!