Overview

Distribution

Distribution: global. Large sharks with pointed snouts and spindle-shaped bodies. Large gill openings. First dorsal fin large, high, erect and angular or somewhat rounded. Second dorsal and anal fins minute. Caudal peduncle with a distinct keel; large teeth; fifth gill opening in front of pectoral fin; spiracle sometimes absent. Maximum length up to 6.4 m or more. Fast swimming predators. Some are maneaters. Ovoviviparous without a yolk-sac placenta but with uterine cannibalism.
  • MASDEA (1997).
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 435
Specimens with Sequences: 375
Specimens with Barcodes: 312
Species: 6
Species With Barcodes: 6
Public Records: 185
Public Species: 5
Public BINs: 5
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Lamnidae

Lamnidae is a family of sharks, commonly known as mackerel sharks or white sharks. They are large, fast-swimming sharks, found in oceans worldwide. The name of the family is formed from the Greek word, Lamna, which means fish of prey, and was derived from the Greek legendary creature Lamia.[2]

These sharks have pointed snouts, spindle-shaped bodies, and large gill openings. The first dorsal fin is large, high, stiff and angular or somewhat rounded. The second dorsal and anal fins are minute. The caudal peduncle has a couple or less distinct keels. The teeth are gigantic. The fifth gill opening is in front of the pectoral fin and spiracles are sometimes absent. They are heavily built sharks, sometimes weighing nearly twice as much as sharks of comparable length from other families. Many sharks in the family are among the fastest-swimming fish, although the massive Carcharodon is slower due to its great size.

Genera and species[edit]

The family contains five living species in three genera:[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2009). "Lamnidae" in FishBase. January 2009 version.
  2. ^ ISBN 9781258302863: A source-book of biological names and terms, 1944, Edmund Carroll Jaeger
  • Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2006). "Lamnidae" in FishBase. March 2006 version.
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