Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Small petrels. Blue -grey above, white below, with dark M-marks on upper wings (from behind) formed by blackish colouring on outer primaries, leading edge to ‘wrist’ and across wing-coverts to scapular ends. Tail wedge-shaped with dark terminal bands and 12 feathers. Skin under mandible distensible, forming a pouch. <388>
  • Brown, L.H., E.K. Urban & K. Newman (1982). The Birds of Africa, Volume I. Academic Press, London.
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 3406 specimens in 7 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 3286 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 0
  Temperature range (°C): -1.569 - 16.532
  Nitrate (umol/L): 1.697 - 30.497
  Salinity (PPS): 33.529 - 35.307
  Oxygen (ml/l): 5.761 - 8.188
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.336 - 2.135
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.479 - 89.471

Graphical representation

Temperature range (°C): -1.569 - 16.532

Nitrate (umol/L): 1.697 - 30.497

Salinity (PPS): 33.529 - 35.307

Oxygen (ml/l): 5.761 - 8.188

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.336 - 2.135

Silicate (umol/l): 1.479 - 89.471
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:21
Specimens with Sequences:20
Specimens with Barcodes:17
Species:6
Species With Barcodes:6
Public Records:1
Public Species:1
Public BINs:1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Pachyptila

Pachyptila is a genus of seabirds in the family Procellariidae and the order Procellariiformes. The members of this genus and the blue petrel form a sub-group called prions.

Etymology[edit]

The name Pachyptila derives from the Greek words παχύς (pachýs, "thick" or "stout") and πτίλον (ptílon, "feather"). Also from the Greek language, prion comes from the word πριόνι (prióni, "saw"), in reference to the serrated edges of its bill.[1]

Taxonomy[edit]

All the members of this genus, along with the rest of the Procellariiformes, share certain identifying features. First, they have nasal passages that attach to the upper bill called naricorns. Although the nostrils on the albatross are on the sides of the bill. The bills of Procellariiformes are also unique in that they are split into between seven and nine horny plates. They produce a stomach oil made up of wax esters and triglycerides that is stored in the proventriculus. This can be sprayed out of their mouths as a defence against predators and as an energy rich food source for chicks and for the adults during their long flights.[2] Finally, they also have a salt gland that is situated above the nasal passage and helps desalinate their bodies, due to the high amount of ocean water that they imbibe. It excretes a high saline solution from their nose.[3]

Species[edit]

Behaviour[edit]

The members of this genus primarily eat zooplankton by filtering water through their upper bill. Some even hydroplane, a technique where they filter food out the water while flying with their bill in the ocean. They breed colonially, and do so near the ocean, usually with the same mate for life. Both sexes help incubate the egg, and care for the chick.[5]

Range and habitat[edit]

They are pelagic and seldom come to land, except to breed. Also, they all stay in the Southern Hemisphere, and breed on subantarctic islands except the fairy prion which breeds on subtropical islands.[4]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Gotch, A. T. (1995)
  2. ^ Double, M. C. (2003)
  3. ^ Ehrlich, Paul R. (1988)
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Clements, James (2007)
  5. ^ Maynard, B. J. (2003)

References[edit]

  • Brands, Sheila (14 Aug 2008). "Systema Naturae 2000 / Classification - Genus Pachyptila". Project: The Taxonomicon. Retrieved 22 July 2009. 
  • Clements, James (2007). The Clements Checklist of the Birds of the World (6 ed.). Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. ISBN 978-0-8014-4501-9. 
  • Double, M. C. (2003). "Procellariiformes (Tubenosed Seabirds)". In Hutchins, Michael; Jackson, Jerome A.; Bock, Walter J. et al. Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia. 8 Birds I Tinamous and Ratites to Hoatzins. Joseph E. Trumpey, Chief Scientific Illustrator (2 ed.). Farmington Hills, MI: Gale Group. pp. 107–111. ISBN 0-7876-5784-0. 
  • Ehrlich, Paul R.; Dobkin, David, S.; Wheye, Darryl (1988). The Birders Handbook (First ed.). New York, NY: Simon & Schuster. pp. 29–31. ISBN 0-671-65989-8. 
  • Gotch, A. F. (1995) [1979]. "Albatrosses, Fulmars, Shearwaters, and Petrels". Latin Names Explained A Guide to the Scientific Classifications of Reptiles, Birds & Mammals. New York, NY: Facts on File. p. 192. ISBN 0-8160-3377-3. 
  • Maynard, B. J. (2003). "Shearwaters, petrels, and fulmars (Procellariidae)". In Hutchins, Michael; Jackson, Jerome A.; Bock, Walter J. et al. Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia. 8 Birds I Tinamous and Ratites to Hoatzins. Joseph E. Trumpey, Chief Scientific Illustrator (2 ed.). Farmington Hills, MI: Gale Group. pp. 123–133. ISBN 0-7876-5784-0. 
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