Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Size: medium. Plumage: black or brown with whitish throats. Other characters: feet heterodactyl, but appear pamprodactyl.
  • Fry, C.H., S. Keith & E.K. Urban (1988). The Birds of Africa, Volume III. Academic Press, London.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 52 specimens in 8 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 29 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 0
  Temperature range (°C): 8.891 - 11.597
  Nitrate (umol/L): 1.206 - 12.040
  Salinity (PPS): 6.607 - 35.137
  Oxygen (ml/l): 6.271 - 8.052
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.284 - 0.653
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.816 - 10.887

Graphical representation

Temperature range (°C): 8.891 - 11.597

Nitrate (umol/L): 1.206 - 12.040

Salinity (PPS): 6.607 - 35.137

Oxygen (ml/l): 6.271 - 8.052

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.284 - 0.653

Silicate (umol/l): 1.816 - 10.887
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Animal / parasite / ectoparasite
imago of Crataerina hirundinis ectoparasitises Apus
Other: minor host/prey

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:35Public Records:12
Specimens with Sequences:23Public Species:3
Specimens with Barcodes:22Public BINs:3
Species:5         
Species With Barcodes:5         
          
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Apus

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Apus (genus)


The bird genus Apus comprise some of the Old World members of the family Apodidae, commonly known as swifts.

They are among the fastest birds in the world. They resemble swallows, to which they are not related, but have shorter tails and sickle-shaped wings. Swifts spend most of their life aloft, have very short legs and use them mostly to cling to surfaces.

Taxonomic history of Apus[edit]

Before the 1950s, there was some controversy over which group of organism should have the genus name Apus.[1] In 1801 Bosc gave the small crustacean organisms known today as Triops the genus name Apus, and later authors continued to use this term. Keilhack suggested (in 1909) that this was incorrect since there was already an avian genus named Apus by Scopoli in 1777 . It wasn't until 1958 when the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN) ruled against the use of the genus name Apus and instead recognized the term Triops that the controversy finally ended.

Systematics[edit]

Known fossil species are:

  • Apus gaillardi (Middle/Late Miocene of La Grive-St.-Alban, France)
  • Apus wetmorei (Early - Late Pliocene? of SC and SE Europe)
  • Apus baranensis (Late Pliocene of SE Europe)
  • Apus submelba (Middle Pleistocene of Slovakia)

The Miocene "Apus" ignotus is now placed in Procypseloides.

References[edit]

  1. ^ O. S. Møller, J. Olesen, and J. T. Høeg (2003). "SEM studies on the early larval development of Triops crancriformis (Bosc)(Crustacea: Branchiopoda, Notostraca)". Acta Zoologica 84: 267–284. doi:10.1046/j.1463-6395.2003.00146.x. 
  • Chantler, Phil & Driessens, Gerald (2000): Swifts : a guide to the swifts and treeswifts of the world. Pica Press, Mountfield, East Sussex. ISBN 1-873403-83-6
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!