Overview

Brief Summary

Dinochelus ausubeli is a new species of deepwater lobster (family Nephropidae) first collected in 2007 from the Philippine Sea off the island of Luzon and was formally described in 2010. The species is so distinct that it was not only described as a new species but placed in a newly erected genus as well (Dinochelus). "Dinochelus" is derived from the Greek dinos, meaning "terrible", and chela, meaning "claw", an allusion to the massive, spinose major claw. The specific epithet ausubeli honors Jesse Ausubel, an enthusiastic sponsor of the Census of Marine Life, a major effort to document marine life in the first decade of the 21st century. (Ahyong et al. 2010)

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Distribution

Dinochelus ausubeli is currently known only from the type locality in the Philippine Sea off the island of Luzon (Ahyong et al. 2010).

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Physical Description

Morphology

Dinochelus ausubeli is a small lobster with long, slender spiny claws. The left and right claws are strongly dimorphic in size. Body color in life is translucent white overall (including the cornea), with the central third diffusely reddish-pink. The abdominal somites and tailfan have diffuse reddish-pink patches and blotches. Antennular flagella, antennal flagella, and pereopod 1 chelae are reddish-pink. Pereopods 2 to 5 are white. (Ahyong et al. 2010)

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Diagnostic Description

The eyes of Dinochelus ausubeli are well developed and movable, with a cornea present. The surfaces and margins of pleura 2 to 5 have laterally minute granules or spinules. Major and minor pereopod 1 palms have numerous spinules; occlusal margins of the pollex and dactylus bear 2 divergent rows of spines. Fingers of the pereopod 1 minor chela are 3 times as long as the palm. The uropodal exopod proximal segment has a spinose outer margin; the width of the distal segment is greater than half the width of the proximal segment. (Ahyong et al. 2010) For a more detailed technical description refer to Ahyong et al. (2010).

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Look Alikes

Lookalikes

Species of Dinochelus, Thaumastocheles, and Thaumastochelopsis are superficially very similar, and apart from eye, uropod, and maxilliped form, differ most prominently in major cheliped armature. Specimens collected by trawl or dredge are very often damaged, but even in the case of incomplete specimens, or where only a major cheliped is collected, D. ausubeli is nevertheless identifiable. Of the known thaumastocheliform nephropids, the first chelipeds of D. ausubeli are most similar to those of Thaumastocheles zaleucus (from the Caribbean Sea), but those of D. ausubeli have distinctly spinose palms (versus at most a few scattered spinules) and the fingers of the minor pereopod 1 are proportionally longer, being three times (versus less than twice) the palm length. The cheliped armature of other species of Thaumastocheles and Thaumastochelopsis includes a single row of either upright spines or low, triangular serrations rather than the two divergent rows of slender spines on the occlusal margins of the fingers seen in D. ausubeli. (Ahyong et al. 2010)

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Evolution and Systematics

Evolution

Systematics and Taxonomy

Dinochelus is most closely related to Thaumastocheles and Thaumastochelopsis, sharing the distinctive strongly dimorphic first pereopods in which the major chela has a short bulbous palm and long, slender spinous fingers, as well as a mixture of other features of both genera. (Ahyong et al. 2010)

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Dinochelus ausubeli

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Dinochelus ausubeli

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Dinochelus

Dinochelus ausubeli is a small deep sea lobster discovered in 2007 in the Philippines during the Census of Marine Life and described in 2010 in the new genus Dinochelus.

Description[edit]

Dinochelus ausubeli has a carapace length of around 31 millimetres (1.2 in), and is in life mostly translucent white, with reddish pink colouring near the middle of the carapace, on the tail fan, on the antennae, and on the first pereiopods (including the claws).[1] Its two claws are very different in size, are elongated, and bear many long teeth on the inner surface.[1]

Distribution and discovery[edit]

D. ausubeli is only known from its type locality, 15°56′N 121°45′E / 15.933°N 121.750°E / 15.933; 121.750, off the coast of Luzon in the Philippines.[1] It was found by trawling at a depth of around 250 metres (820 ft) in 2007,[1] as part of the Census of Marine Life, a major effort to document marine life in the first decade of the 21st century.[2][3][4] It was described in 2010 by an international team of scientists.[1]

Taxonomy[edit]

The new species was placed in a separate genus, Dinochelus, whose name derives from the Greek roots δεινός (dinos), meaning "terrible" or "fearful", and χηλή (chela), meaning "claw".[1] The specific epithet "ausubeli" honours Jesse H. Ausubel, the sponsor of the Census of Marine Life, "in recognition of his vision and support for marine biodiversity exploration".[1]

Dinochelus belongs to a group of lobsters previously recognised as the separate family, Thaumastochelidae, which also includes the genera Thaumastocheles and Thaumastochelopsis.[1] These genera all show very long, toothed claws with a bulbous base, with one claw much longer than the other.[1] Dinochelus has features in common with each of those genera; on the basis of DNA sequencing using cytochrome oxidase I, Dinochelus is thought to be the sister taxon to Thaumostocheles + Thaumastochelopsis.[1] It is distinguished from either genus by the unusual, T-shaped form of the epistome.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Shane T. Ahyong, Tin-Yam Chan & Philippe Bouchet (2010). "Mighty claws: a new genus and species of lobster from the Philippine deep sea (Crustacea, Decapoda, Nephropidae)". Zoosystema 32 (3): 525–535. doi:10.5252/z2010n3a11. 
  2. ^ "Newly discovered deep sea lobster named for Rockefeller's Jesse Ausubel". Newswire. Rockefeller University. February 1, 2011. Retrieved 27 April 2011. 
  3. ^ Leo Shapiro. "Dinochelus ausubeli". EOL Species Rapid Response (Lifedesk). Encyclopedia of Life & Lifedesk community. Retrieved 27 April 2011. 
  4. ^ Nicholas Wade (25 April 2011). "A passion for nature, and really long lists". Science - Scientist at Work (New York Times). Retrieved 4 April 2011. 
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