Overview

Brief Summary

North American Ecology (US and Canada)

Anatrytone logan is resident to the eastern United States as far west as the Rocky mountains (Scott 1986). Habitats are subtropical to transition zone moist areas with tall grasses. Host plants are grass species Andropogon gerardii, Erianthus divaricatus, Panicum virgatum. Eggs are laid on the host plant singly. There is a variable number of flights each year dependent on latitude, with one flight between late June-July 30 in the northern part of their range and multiple flights between April 1-Oct. 31 in the southern part of their range (Scott 1986).
  • Scott, J. A. 1986. The butterflies of North America. Stanford University Press.
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Comprehensive Description

General Description

The only other skipper to share the unmarked, bright orange upperside with a narrow dark border and unmarked under side is the European Skipper (Thymelicus lineola). The Delaware Skipper is, however, larger (25 - 35 mm wingspan) and has a more pointed forewing shape. Alberta populations are assigned to subspecies lagus (Layberry et al. 1998).
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Distribution

The Delaware Skipper is found throughout the eastern United States, and reaches its northern range limits in southern Ontario and the southern prairie provinces (Layberry et al. 1998, Opler 1999). In Alberta it is known from the major river valleys in the prairie ecoregion, north as far as the Drumheller area (Bird et al. 1995).
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occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Ecology

Habitat

Shrubby ravines, valley bottoms and coulees of the short-grass prairies.
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Comments: A truly odd assortment of habitats, especially in the Northeast. Dry to mesic bluestem prairies, right of ways, barrens and oak savannas with little bluestem are commonly used. Also other types of dry to moist grasslands and old fields dominated by native grasses. Also bogs, fens, marshes and sedge meadows often with CAREX STRICTA overwhelmingly dominant. Seems very often associated with PANICUM VIRGATUM, SCHIZACHYRIUM SCOPARIUM in northeastern grasslands and with CAREX STRICTA in wetlands in the Northeast. Much of this from observations by D. Schweitzer from Ontario to New England south to New Jersey. See also Iftner et al. (1993) for a similarly broad range of habitats in Ohio. Adults do occur in gardens for nectar.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

The larval hostplants in Alberta are not known. In other parts of its range, larvae feed on wooly beardgrass (Erianthus sp.), panic grass (Panicum spp.) big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) and little bluestem (Schizachyrium spp.) (Bird et al. 1995, Layberry et al. 1998). Adults nectar at thistles (Cirsium spp.), milkweed (Asclepias spp.) and skeleton-weed (Lygodesmia spp.) (Bird et al. 1995), and sip moisture at mud (Nielsen 1999).
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Associations

Flowering Plants Visited by Anatrytone logan in Illinois

Anatrytone logan W.H. Edwards: Hesperiidae, Lepidoptera
(observations are from Robertson, Reed, Bouseman et al., and Clinebell; this is the Delaware Skipper; an alternative scientific name for this species is Atrytone delaware)

Asteraceae: Cirsium arvense sn (Re), Echinacea pallida sn (Cl), Rudbeckia hirta sn (Re), Silphium perfoliatum sn (Rb); Lamiaceae: Monarda fistulosa sn (Rb, Re), Prunella vulgaris sn (Rb), Teucrium canadense sn (Rb); Polemoniaceae: Phlox pilosa sn (Re); Pontederiaceae: Pontederia cordata sn (BSW); Rubiaceae: Cephalanthus occidentalis sn (Rb); Verbenaceae: Verbena stricta sn fq (Rb, Re)

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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Adults feed on flower nectar and mud. Males perch for females (Scott, 1986).
  • Scott, J. A. 1986. The butterflies of North America. Stanford University Press.
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Cyclicity

One brood annually, with most adults appearing early to mid July.
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Life Cycle

The eggs are hemispherical with two reddish rings, and are laid on blades of grass (Bird et al. 1995). The bluish-white larva is covered with minute black bumps, with a black band near the posterior end (Layberry et al. 1998). Adult males perch on shrubs such as buckbrush (Symphoricarpos occidentalis) (McCabe & Post 1977). In North Dakota, females of the nominate subspecies fly among clumps of big bluestem and lay four to five eggs per grass clump (McCabe & Post 1977).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Atrytone logan

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Anatrytone logan

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 16
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

Currently secure; Habitat susceptible to flooding due to dam construction.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Anatrytone logan

The Delaware Skipper (Anatrytone logan) is a North American butterfly in the family Hesperiidae (skippers), subfamily Hesperiinae (grass skippers). This skipper ranges from the southern Prairies in Canada and southern Ontario and southwards through the midwestern and eastern states in the US.

Description

Both females and males are yellow orange with black borders and dark brown veins. The borders are broader on the front and back edges of the hindwing. "The underside is yellowish orange, lacking any markings except a narrow dark border on the forewing." [1]

Wingspan: 26 to 30 mm.

References and external links

  1. ^ Delaware Skipper, Butterflies of Canada
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Two rather easily separable apparent species go under this name, one mostly from the New Jersey Pine Barrens northward and the other from more southern parts of New Jersey and Missouri to Florida. Pine Barrens larvae and Florida larvae are quite different (Marc Minno) and habitats also differ markedly in New Jersey. Florida adults look like the more southern New Jersey populations. The northern entity is univoltine, the southern one bivoltine even in New Jersey, except perhaps in the Mullica River basin its apparent northern limit. Given the Type Localities of the names logan (Lansing, MI) and delaware (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), it is highly likely both names refer to the single brooded northern entity. It is presently uncertain which entity the subspecies lagus (TL Oak Creek Canyon, Colorado) goes with, although one would expect it to be the northern one. It does not appear that either entity is globally rare.

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