Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: 200,000-2,500,000 square km (about 80,000-1,000,000 square miles)

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Where crown vetch is the main foodplant mostly highway shoulders and other highly disturbed situations, originally more or less a species of woodlands, scrub and brushy prairies.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Associations

Flowering Plants Visited by Erynnis baptisiae in Illinois

Erynnis baptisiae Forbes: Hesperiidae, Lepidoptera
(observations are from Robertson and Clinebell; this skipper is the Wild Indigo Duskywing; Robertson misidentified this species as Erynnis persius, which has not been found in Illinois)

Asteraceae: Liatris pycnostachya (Cl); Boraginaceae: Lithospermum canescens sn (Rb); Scrophulariaceae: Collinsia verna sn np (Rb); Verbenaceae: Verbena stricta sn (Rb); Violaceae: Viola striata sn np (Rb)

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Erynnis baptisiae

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Widespread use of the exotic crown vetch has allowed this skipper to become abundant in most places where this plant is widely planted or spreading on it own, and both the skipper and plant are likely to spread. Adaptation to other exotic legumes is strongly suspected at least in New Jersey. Where it is still dependent on native foodplants, especially lupine, this skipper may be uncommon to even rare.

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Global Short Term Trend: Increase of 10 to >25%

Global Long Term Trend: Decline of 30-70%

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Wikipedia

Erynnis baptisiae

The Wild Indigo Duskywing (Erynnis baptisiae) is a butterfly of the Hesperiidae family. It is found from southern New England and southern Ontario west to central Nebraska, south to Georgia, the Gulf Coast, and south-central Texas.

The species is rapidly expanding its range and abundance by colonizing plantings of crown vetch along roadways and railroad beds.

Erynnis lucilius, Erynnis baptisiae and Erynnis persius belong to the "Persius species complex", a confusing group of very similar species.

The wingspan is 35–41 mm. Adults are on wing from late April to early June and again from July to August. There are two generations per year.

The larvae mainly feed on Baptisia tinctoria, but have also been recorded on Baptisia australis, Lupinus perennis, Thermopsis villosa and Coronilla varia. Adults feed on nectar from flowers of blackberry, white sweet clover, dogbane, sunflower, crimson clover and probably others.

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