Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Dry barren limestone scree slopes from 1050 to 1350 meters and occasionally valley bottoms (Layberry et al., 1998). Opler (1998) notes habitats are above timberline.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Euchloe naina

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 7
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NU - Unrankable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GU - Unrankable

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Wikipedia

Euchloe naina

Green Marble (Euchloe naina) is a species of butterfly that occurs in northern North America and Siberia.[1]

It is mostly white with black markings on the topside of the forewing tips and body. The underside has greenish-grey veins especially in the hindwing. Wing span is from 30 to 36 mm.[1]

Flight season in North American is from 7 to 28 June.[1]

Subspecies[edit]

Listed alphabetically.[2]

  • E. n. jakutia Back, 1990
  • E. n. naina Kozhantshikov, 1923
  • E. n. occidentalis Verity, 1908

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Green Marble, Butterflies of Canada
  2. ^ Euchloe, funet.fi


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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: A poorly known species of remote regions still not fully resolved taxonomically. Cris Guppy (e-mail to D. Schweitzer of May, 2001) indicates: "As presently used in the literature the name applies to populations occurring in northwestern BC, southwestern YK, northern YK (Ogilvie Mountains), [probably Alaska], and Siberia. It is likely that at least three taxa (subspecies and/or species) are involved in North America."

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Disclaimer

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