Overview

Brief Summary

North American Ecology (US and Canada)

Resident in western North America (Scott 1986). Habitats are OPEN AREAS. Host plants are usually herbaceous with hosts including many species, but mostly in one family, Cruciferae. Eggs are laid on the host plant singly. Individuals overwinter as pupae. There is a variable number of flights each year with the approximate flight time MAY1-JUN30 in the northern part of the range and MAR1-APR30 in the southern part of their range (Scott 1986). Considered as Euchloe ausonia by some sources (Scott 1986).
  • Scott, J. A. 1986. The butterflies of North America. Stanford University Press.
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Comprehensive Description

General Description

There are three superficially similar marble species in the province. The Olympia Marble (E. olympia) is unlike the other marbles in that the green markings of the underside are quite reduced, with a banded rather than a blotchy appearance. It is also restricted to prairie grassland habitat. The Northern Marble (E. creusa) is slightly smaller than ausonides (wingspan of 24 - 36 mm compared to 30 - 48mm), and generally has more green than white on the hindwing underside, in a more broken rather than banded pattern. Our populations have been variously assigned to subspecies mayi (Bird et al. 1995, Guppy & Shepard 2001) or ausonides (Layberry et al. 1998).
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Distribution

The Large Marble ranges from Alaska south to California and New Mexico, and in a narrow band along the southern boreal region to west-central Ontario and Michigan (Opler 1999).
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occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (>2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)) Western mountains from Alaska and Alberta south to central California and New Mexico, and east to Manitoba and Great Lakes region. Subspecies coloradensis occurs in Rocky Mountains of Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico; subspecies mayi occurs in Manitoba.

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Ecology

Habitat

Primarily dry meadows in open woodlands of the boreal, parkland and montane regions.
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Comments: Mountainous areas, open areas, open forests, meadows; taiga. Larvae feed on various mustards (family Brassicaceae). Layberry et al. (1998) indicate sandy pine woods as most favored in Canada.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

The larvae likely feed on a variety of wild mustards in Alberta; females oviposit on Drummond's Rock Cress (Arabis drummondii) in the Peace River region (Bird et al. 1995). Hooper (1973) is one of the few sources to report adult nectaring, which occurs at the flowers of larval hostplants.
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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

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Global Abundance

10,000 to >1,000,000 individuals

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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Adults feed mainly from nectar. Males patrol for females (Scott, 1986).
  • Scott, J. A. 1986. The butterflies of North America. Stanford University Press.
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Cyclicity

One brood annually, adults most often encountered in late May to early July.
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Life Cycle

The egg is orange and elongated, tapered near the tip. The mature larva is greyish-green and black-spotted, with a lateral white and yellow subdorsal stripe (Guppy & Shepard 2001). The pupae are light brown with darker longitudinal lines, and have a pointy, elongated head projection (Guppy & Shepard 2001).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Euchloe ausonides

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 29
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

Not of concern.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Most widespread New World member of genus.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: D : Unthreatened throughout its range, communities may be threatened in minor portions of the range or degree of variation falls within natural variation

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Management

Global Protection: Many to very many (13 to >40) occurrences appropriately protected and managed

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Wikipedia

Euchloe ausonides

Large Marble or Creamy Marblewing (Euchloe ausonides) is a species of butterfly that occurs in North America.

Subspecies[edit]

References[edit]


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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Includes ogilvia. See Opler and Warren (2002) and Layberry et al. (1998).

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