Overview

Comprehensive Description

General Description

A medium-sized pyralid with a wingspan of 15-30 mm. The basal third of the forewing is reddish-brown, the median area brownish-white and the terminal area reddish-brown. There are white AM and PM lines and there is a light subterminal line back of a reddish-brown fringe. The hindwing is grayish-white crossed by two white lines. At rest, the adults fold their wings flat while the abdomen is extended and curled over the body (Goater 1986).
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Distribution

Worldwide. Reported from many areas in Alberta by Bowman (1951). This moth has been found in most homes in Alberta.
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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Ecology

Habitat

Inside houses and storehouses.Inside houses and storehouses.
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Trophic Strategy

Larvae feed on flour and stored grain.
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Associations

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
larva of Hymenolepis diminuta endoparasitises larva of Pyralis farinalis

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Mainly May to September.
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Life Cycle

The larvae are dirty white with a dark brown head (Forbes 1923). As in Plodia interpunctella, they live in a silken gallery in their food source. Once an infestation is discovered, the affected food source should be discarded and the area cleaned up. Freezing food products suspected of containing larvae is a good idea. The adults are said to fly at night (Goater 1986).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pyralis farinalis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 6
Specimens with Barcodes: 48
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Pyralis farinalis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 5 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNAGTTGGCACTTCTTTAAGTCTTTTAATTCGAGCTGAATTAGGTAACCCTGGATCTCTTATTGGGGATGACCAAATTTATAATACTATTGTAACAGCTCATGCTTTTATTATAATTTTTTTTATAGTTATACCAATTATAATCGGAGGATTTGGCAATTGATTAGTTCCTTTAATATTAGGAGCTCCTGATATAGCCTTTCCCCGAATAAATAATATAAGATTTTGACTCTTACCCCCTTCTTTAACCCTCCTTATTTCTAGAAGTATTGTTGAAAATGGAGCAGGTACTGGTTGAACAGTCTACCCTCCACTTTCCTCTAATATTGCTCATAGTGGAACTTCTGTTGACTTGGCAATTTTCTCTCTTCATTTAGCAGGAATCTCTTCTATTTTAGGGGCTGTCAATTTTATTACAACAATTATTAATATAAAATTAAATAATCTTTCTTTTGATCAAATGCCTCTTTTTGTTTGATCTGTCGGAATTACCGCTTTATTATTACTTTTATCTCTGCCCGTATTAGCTGGAGCTATTACTATATTACTTACAGATCGTAACCTAAACACTTCTTTTTTCGATCCTGCNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Conservation

Conservation Status

A common pest (Covell 1984), of no conservation concern.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Pyralis farinalis

"Meal Moth" redirects here; not to be confused with "flour moth (disambiguation)".

The Meal Moth (Pyralis farinalis) is a cosmopolitan moth of the family Pyralidae. Its larvae (caterpillars) are pests of certain stored foods, namely milled plant products.

It is the type species of the genus Pyralis, and by extension of its entire tribe (Pyralini), subfamily (Pyralinae) and family. Its synanthropic habits were noted even by 18th- and 19th-century naturalists, who described it using terms like domesticalis ("of home and hearth"), fraterna ("as close as a brother"), or the currently-valid farinalis ("of the flour").[1]

At rest, adult moths (imagines) typically hold the tip of their abdomen at 90° to their body. Their upperwings are fairly colourful by moth standards, with a wingspan of 18–30 mm. Adults fly from June to August.[2]

In Great Britain and some other locations – particularly outside its natural range – it is mostly restricted to anthropogenic habitats of stored grain, e.g. barns and warehouses. Other foods recorded as larval food are hay and straw, dried fruits, cork and even candy.[3]

Synonyms[edit]

Now-obsolete scientific names of this species are:[1]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b See references in Savela (2009)
  2. ^ Kimber (2010)
  3. ^ Grabe (1942), Kimber (2010)

References[edit]

  • Grabe, Albert (1942): Eigenartige Geschmacksrichtungen bei Kleinschmetterlingsraupen ["Strange tastes among micromoth caterpillars"]. Zeitschrift des Wiener Entomologen-Vereins 27: 105-109 [in German]. PDF fulltext
  • Kimber, Ian (2010): UKMoths – Meal Moth. Retrieved 2010-APR-12.
  • Savela, Markku (2009): Markku Savela's Lepidoptera and some other life forms – Aglossa. Version of 2009-APR-25. Retrieved 2010-APR-12.


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