Overview

Brief Summary

North American Ecology (US and Canada)

Resident in southwest North America (Scott 1986). Habitats are LOWLAND DESERTS. Host plants are usually herbaceous with most known hosts largely restricted to a few species in one family, Cruciferae. Eggs are laid on the host plant singly. Individuals overwinter as pupae. There is one flight each year with the approximate flight time MAY1-JUN1 in the northern part of the range and FEB1-APR30 in the southern part of their range (Scott 1986).
  • Scott, J. A. 1986. The butterflies of North America. Stanford University Press.
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Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (250-20,000 square km (about 100-8000 square miles)) Southern and eastern California to northern Baja California, east through parts of Nevada, and southeast through much of Arizona to southern New Mexico and extreme western Texas (from Scott, 1986), particularly in desert regions.

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Habitats mostly low desert; also chapparal, woodland hills, canyons, glades, ridgeline meadows, that is various semi-open to open situations with the larval foodplants up to about 1800 meters.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

Comments: Larvae on various Brassicaceae. Probably eat flowers and developing pods only.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 21 - 80

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Global Abundance

2500 - 10,000 individuals

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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Adults feed mainly from nectar. Males patrol for females (Scott, 1986).
  • Scott, J. A. 1986. The butterflies of North America. Stanford University Press.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Anthocharis cethura

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 8
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: In some areas, mainly in southern California deserts, it is subject to a wide variety of pressures but over all this is a fairly widespread desert speices and is not in trouble rangewide.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: B : Moderately threatened throughout its range, communities provide natural resources that when exploited alter the composition and structure of the community over the long-term, but are apparently recoverable

Comments: Urbanization, off road vehicles, possibly air pollution.

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Management

Global Protection: Few to several (1-12) occurrences appropriately protected and managed

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Includes A. Pima. These two form a gradual cline between California, Nevada and Arizona, as discussed by Emmel et al. (1998) (Opler and Warren 2004). It could be recognized as a subspecies if there were a reason to do so.

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Disclaimer

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