Overview

Brief Summary

North American Ecology (US and Canada)

Asterocampa celtis is a year-round residen in the southwestern United States, and ranges into s. Mex. (Scott 1986). Habitats are subtropical to transition zone wooded areas. Host plants are trees including several species in one genus, Celtis (Ulmaceae). Eggs are laid on the host plant singly or sometimes in groups of several to 20 eggs per cluster. Individuals overwinter as third-stage larvae. There are multiple flights each year in the southern part of their range (s. Tex and Fla.) approximate flight times Mar.1-Nov 30; three flights in Mo; and about 2 flights in the northern portion of their range (June1-Sept30) (Scott 1986).
  • Scott, J. A. 1986. The butterflies of North America. Stanford University Press.
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Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (>2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)) Massachusetts south to N. Florida, E. Texas, and west to Dakotas.

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Virtually anyplace, including urban yards, with at least two or three hackberry trees. Most typical in edge or riparian areas in many regions; more general in the humid east.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Associations

Flowering Plants Visited by Asterocampa celtis in Illinois

Asterocampa celtis Boisduval & LeConte: Nymphalidae, Lepidoptera
(this observation is from Reed; this butterfly is the Hackberry Emperor)

Lamiaceae: Monarda fistulosa sn (Re)

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

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Global Abundance

10,000 to >1,000,000 individuals

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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Adults feed on sap and fruit, sometimes flower nectar, mud, carrion and dung. Males perch for females (Scott, 1986).
  • Scott, J. A. 1986. The butterflies of North America. Stanford University Press.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Asterocampa celtis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 34
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Widespread and common in much of the USA.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: D : Unthreatened throughout its range, communities may be threatened in minor portions of the range or degree of variation falls within natural variation

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Management

Global Protection: Many to very many (13 to >40) occurrences appropriately protected and managed

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Wikipedia

Asterocampa celtis

The Hackberry Emperor (Asterocampa celtis) is a North American butterfly that belongs to the family of brushfooted butterflies, Nymphalidae.[1]

Description[edit]

The upper side of the wings is mostly gray-brown or orange-brown. The fore wing subterminal area has one or two eyespots, sometimes with blue centers. The underside of the wings is either tan or light gray-brown. The hind wings have a row of black, yellow-ringed, eyespots centered in blue.

Habitat[edit]

The Hackberry Emperor may be seen near woodland edges, near creeks, around buildings, and around damp, muddy spots.

Food Plants[edit]

The adults usually do not visit flowers, but feed on rotting fruit, tree sap, dung, and animal carcasses.

Host Plants[edit]

Hackberry trees are the only host plants of the Hackberry Emperor.

Life cycle[edit]

Males perch to await females. The pale green eggs are laid in clusters on the host plant. Young larvae feed communally. The thorny headed larva is bright grass green, with yellow and chartreuse stripes. It has two green tails projecting from the rear. The sharply horned chrysalis is a bluish green color. The Hackberry Emperor overwinters as a half grown larva.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: A. MONTIS, A. ANTONIA, and A. ALICIA are sometimes considered subspecies of this taxon.

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