Ecology

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Animal / parasite / ectoparasite
imago of Ornithomya fringillina ectoparasitises Muscicapidae
Other: major host/prey

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:1,541Public Records:768
Specimens with Sequences:1,411Public Species:99
Specimens with Barcodes:1,393Public BINs:112
Species:150         
Species With Barcodes:132         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Muscicapidae

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Wikipedia

Magpie-robin

White-Rumped Shama

The magpie-robins or shamas (from shama, Hindi for C. malabaricus)[1] are medium-sized insectivorous birds (some also eat berries and other fruit) in the genera Copsychus and Trichixos. They were formerly in the thrush family Turdidae, but are more often now treated as part of the Old World flycatcher Muscicapidae. The Seychelles Magpie-Robin is one of the most endangered birds in the world, with a population of less than 250, although this is a notable increase from just 16 in 1970.

These are African and Asian garden and forest dwelling species.

Species list:


References[edit]

  1. ^ Jobling, James A. (1991). A Dictionary of Scientific Bird Names. Oxford University Press. p. 216. ISBN 0-19-854634-3. 
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Robin-chat

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Redstart

Redstarts are a group of small Old World birds. They were formerly classified in the thrush family (Turdidae), but are now known to be part of the Old World flycatcher family Muscicapidae. They are currently treated in four genera, the true redstarts Phoenicurus, the closely related genera Chaimarrornis and Rhyacornis, and the less closely related genus Hodgsonius.

These are insectivorous ground feeding birds, most of which have the red tail which gives the group its name; "start" is the modern English reflex of Middle English stert, Old English steort, tail of an animal. Most species are migratory, with northern species being long-distance migrants and more southerly species often being altitudinal migrants breeding at high altitude and moving lower down in winter.[1]

They are small insectivores, the males mostly brightly coloured in various combinations of red, blue, white, and black, the females light brown with a red tail.[1] Recent genetic studies have shown that the genus Phoenicurus is not monophyletic, but may be made so by the inclusion of Chaimarrornis and Rhyacornis within Phoenicurus;[2] this conclusion is yet to be taken up by the International Ornithological Congress.[3]

The New World redstarts in the genera Setophaga and Myioborus are not closely related; they are New World warblers in the family Parulidae. Members of the latter genus, with extensive white and no red in their tails, are now more often called "whitestarts".[4]

Species list

References

  1. ^ a b Hoyo, J. del, et al., eds. (2005). Handbook of the Birds of the World, vol. 10. Barcelona: Lynx Edicions. pp. 768–776. ISBN 84-87334-72-5.
  2. ^ Sangster, G., Alström, P., Forsmark, E., & Olsson, U. (2010). Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis of Old World chats and flycatchers reveals extensive paraphyly at family, subfamily and genus level (Aves: Muscicapidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 57: 380–392 Full text
  3. ^ IOC World Bird List Family Muscicapidae
  4. ^ IOC World Bird List Family Parulidae
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