Ecology

Associations

Animal / parasite / ectoparasite / blood sucker
adult of Forcipomyia paludis sucks the blood of live wing tip of adult of Calopteryx

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 366
Specimens with Sequences: 229
Specimens with Barcodes: 78
Species: 8
Species With Barcodes: 7
Public Records: 210
Public Species: 7
Public BINs: 2
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Calopteryx

Calopteryx is a genus of large damselflies belonging to the family Calopterygidae. The colourful males often have coloured wings whereas the more muted females usually have clear wings although some develop male (androchrome) wing characteristics. In both sexes, there is no pterostigma.[1]

Species[edit]

The genus contains the following species:[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dijkstra, Klaas-Douwe B. (2006). Field Guide to the Dragonflies of Britain and Europe. p. 65. ISBN 0-9531399-4-8. 
  2. ^ Martin Schorr, Martin Lindeboom, Dennis Paulson. "World Odonata List". University of Puget Sound. Retrieved 11 August 2010. 
  3. ^ Lam, Ed. Damselflies of the Northeast. Forest Hills, NY:Biodiversity Press, 2004.
  4. ^ a b c d e "North American Odonata". University of Puget Sound. 2009. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  5. ^ a b c The Status and Distribution of Dragonflies of the Mediterranean Basin. IUCN. 2009. ISBN 2-8317-1161-4. 
  6. ^ a b "Checklist, English common names". DragonflyPix.com. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  7. ^ a b "Checklist of UK Species". British Dragonfly Society. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  8. ^ Manning, Stanley Arthur (1974). The naturalist in south-east England: Kent, Surrey and Sussex. David & Charles. p. 164. 
  9. ^ a b Brian Nelson, Robert Thompson (2004). The Natural History of Ireland's Dragonflies. Ulster Museum. ISBN 978-0-900761-45-4. 
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