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Overview

Brief Summary

Darters are the smallest of the large dragonflies. There are a number of darter species. In the coastal region and on the islands, the following darter species are found: black darter, yellow-winged, ruddy darter, common darter and the vagrant darter. They are often found in the vicinity of stationary waters. Male darters usually have a reddish body. Yellow-winged and ruddy darters are typical migratory dragonflies. They often fly in large groups and when the conditions are good, high in the sky.
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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 1 specimen in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 0
 
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Associations

Known predators

Sympetrum (Sympetrum odonata) is prey of:
Hydrometra
Perca flavescens
Micropterus salmoides
Ambloplites rupestris

Based on studies in:
Finland (Lake or pond)
USA: Wisconsin, Little Rock Lake (Lake or pond)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
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Known prey organisms

Sympetrum (Sympetrum odonata) preys on:
Culex
Chironomus
Sigara
Discoglossus
Tanypodinae
Cloeon
Plactynemis
Alona affinis
Alona quadrangularis
Alona rustica
Alona intermedia
Alona excisa
Disparalona acutirostris
Chydorus
Acantholeberis curvirostris
Ophryoxus gracilis
Scapholeberis kingi
Sida crystallina
Macrocyclops albidus
Eucyclops serrulatus
Acanthocyclops
Microcyclops rubellus
Eucopepoda
Caenis
Bezzia
Chaoborus punctipennis
Albabesmyia
Clinotanypus
Djalmabatista
Guttipelopia
Larsia
Macropelopis
Procladius
Chaetocladius
Corynoneura
Cricotopus
Nanocladius
Micropsectra
Paratanytarsus
Tanytarsus
Cladopelma
Cryptochironomus
Endochrionomus
Glyptotendipes
Microtendipes
Parachironomus
Paratendipes
Polypedilum
Pseudochironomus
Stenochironomus
Xenochironomus
Oligochaeta
Crangonyx gracilis

Based on studies in:
Finland (Lake or pond)
USA: Wisconsin, Little Rock Lake (Lake or pond)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:753
Specimens with Sequences:650
Specimens with Barcodes:525
Species:42
Species With Barcodes:41
Public Records:439
Public Species:36
Public BINs:26
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Sympetrum

Sympetrum is a genus of small to medium-sized skimmer dragonflies, known as darters in the UK and as meadowhawks in the North America. The more than 50 species predominantly live in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere; no Sympetrum species is native to Australia.

Most North American darters fly in late summer and autumn, breeding in ponds and foraging over meadows. Commonly, they are yellow-gold as juveniles, with mature males and some females becoming bright red on part or all of their bodies. An exception to this color scheme is the black darter (Sympetrum danae).[1]

The genus includes the following species:[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Needham, James G.; Minter J. Westfall, Jr. and Michael L. May (2000). Dragonflies of North America (rev. ed.). Gainesville, FL: Scientific Publishers. p. 795. ISBN 0-945417-94-2. 
  2. ^ Martin Schorr, Martin Lindeboom, Dennis Paulson. "World Odonata List". University of Puget Sound. Retrieved 3 Oct 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "North American Odonata". University of Puget Sound. 2009. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Checklist of UK Species". British Dragonfly Society. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Checklist, English common names". DragonflyPix.com. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  6. ^ Suhling, F. & Martens, A. (2011). "Sympetrum dilatatum". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.3. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 3 October 2011. 
  7. ^ Samways, Michael J. (2008). Dragonflies and damselflies of South Africa (1st ed. ed.). Sofia: Pensoft. ISBN 9546423300. 
  8. ^ Autumn Darter, Kochi
  9. ^ Clausnitzer, V. (2007). "Sympetrum haritonovi". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.3. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 3 October 2011. 
  10. ^ Kalkman, V.J. (2009). "Sympetrum nigrifemur". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 25 Aug 2010. 
  11. ^ Paulson, D. R. (2007). "Sympetrum nigrocreatum". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.3. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 3 October 2011. 
  12. ^ Dunkle, S. W. (2000). Dragonflies through Binoculars. OUP. 
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