The following bibliography has been generated by bringing together all references provided by our content partners. There may be duplication.

References

  • Arnett, Ross H. and Jacques, Richard L.. Guide to Insects. Simon and Schuster, 1981.
  • George Beccaloni, Malcolm Scoble, Ian Kitching, Thomas Simonsen, Gaden Robinson, Brian Pitkin, Adrian Hine & Chris Lyal (2013). LepIndex: LepIndex: The Global Lepidoptera Names Index (version 12.3,). In: Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life, 11th March 2013 (Roskov Y., Kunze T., Paglinawan L., Orrell T., Nicolson D., Culham A., Bailly N., Kirk P., Bourgoin T., Baillargeon G., Hernandez F., De Wever A., eds). Digital resource at www.catalogueoflife.org/col/. Species 2000: Reading, UK.
  • Mullen SP. 2006. Wing pattern evolution and the origins of mimicry among North American admiral butterflies (Nymphalidae: Limenitis). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 39: 747-758.
  • Mullen SP. 2006. Wing pattern evolution and the origins of mimicry among North American admiral butterflies (Nymphalidae: Limenitis). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 39, 747-758.
  • Opler, Paul A. A Field Guide to Eastern Butterflies. Houghton Mifflin Company, 1992.
  • Pelham, Jonathan P. 2008. A catalogue of the butterflies of the United States and Canada with a complete bibliography of the descriptive and systematic literature. Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera, vol. 40. xiv + 658
  • Platt AP, Rawson GW, and Balogh G. 1978. Inter-specific hybridization involving Limenitis archippus and its congeneric species (Nymphalidae). J. Lepid. Soc. 32: 289-303.
  • Platt AP. 1983. Evolution of North American butterflies (Limenitis: Nymphalidae). Bull. Entomol. Soc. Amer. 29: 10-22.
  • Platt aP, Rawson GW, Balogh G. 1978. Inter-specific hybridization involving Limenitis archippus and its congeneric species (Nymphalidae). J Lepid Soc, 32, 289-303.
  • Platt aP. 1983. Evolution of North american butterflies (Limenitis: Nymphalidae). Bull Entomol Soc amer, 29, 10-22.
  • Prudic, K. L. and J. C. Oliver. 2008. Once a Batesian mimic, not always a Batesian mimic: mimic reverts back to ancestral phenotype when the model is absent. Proceedings of the Royal Society Series B 275:1125-1132.
  • http://bugguide.net/node/view/362722
  • http://bugguide.net/node/view/362723

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