Ecology

Associations

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
adult of Acanthocephalus ranae endoparasitises small intestine of Rana

Animal / rests in
Aplectana acuminata rests inside intestine (posterior part) of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Balantidium endoparasitises rectum of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
cyst of Diplodiscus subclavatus endoparasitises skin of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
fluke of Dolichosaccus rastellus endoparasitises intestine of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Gorgodera endoparasitises bladder of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
fluke of Gorgoderina vitelliloba endoparasitises bladder of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
fluke of Haematoloechus endoparasitises lung of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
fluke of Haplometra cylindracea endoparasitises lung of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Hexamita intestinalis endoparasitises large intestine of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
larva of Lucilia bufonivora endoparasitises Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
larva of Lucilia silvarum endoparasitises Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
tapeworm of Nematotaenia dispar endoparasitises intestine of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Nyctotherus cordiformis endoparasitises rectum of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
trophozoite of Opalina endoparasitises rectum of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
fluke of Opisthioglyphe ranae endoparasitises intestine of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Oswaldocruzia filiformis endoparasitises intestine (anterior end) of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
fluke of Pleurogenes claviger endoparasitises intestine of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
fluke of Polystoma endoparasitises bladder of Rana

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
adult of Rhabdias bufonis endoparasitises lung of Rana

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 1137
Specimens with Sequences: 851
Specimens with Barcodes: 625
Species: 69
Species With Barcodes: 61
Public Records: 196
Public Species: 22
Public BINs: 35
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rana cf. lessonae

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rana cf. arvalis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Rana cf. papua

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 13 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

TATTTAATTTTTGGCACATGAGCCGGAATAATCGGAACAGCTTTG---AGTTTACTAATCCGAGCAGAGTTAAGCCAACCCGGTACTTTATTAGGGGAT---GATCAAATTTATAATGTTATTGTAACCGCACATGCATTTGTAATAATCTTTTTTATAGTTATACCAATTTTAATTGGGGGTTTCGGAAACTGATTAGTGCCTTTGATA---ATTGGAGCTCCAGACATAGCCTTCCCTCGCATAAATAATATAAGCTTCTGACTTCTCCCCCCCTCCTTCTTTCTTTTACTGGCTTCCTCGGCAGTTGAAGCTGGAGCAGGAACAGGCTGAACAGTTTATCCTCCATTGGCAGGTAACTTAGCCCACGCAGGACCATCAGTTGATCTA---GCCATCTTCTCTCTTCACTTAGCCGGAGTCTCTTCTATTTTAGGCGCAATTAATTTTATTACAACTATTTTTAATATAAAACCTTCATCTACTACACAATATCATATTCCTCTCTTTGTCTGATCCGTCTTAATTACTGCAGTATTATTATTATTGTCTCTTCCAGTCTTAGCTGCT---GGTATTACTATACTCCTTACTGACCGAAACCTTAATACAACCTTTTTTGACCCAGCAGGAGGAGGCGAC
-- end --

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rana cf. papua

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 13
Specimens with Barcodes: 13
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rana cf. dalmatina

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Leopard frog

A leopard frog (sometimes called a meadow frog) can mean any frog of about 14 species within the true frog genus. They are generally similarly colored—green with prominent black spotting that sometimes appears as a leopard pattern. They are distinguished by their distribution and certain rather subtle ecological, behavioral, morphological and genetic traits. Their range in the North-American subcontinent extends throughout temperate and subtropical North America to northern Mexico, with some species found even further south. They are also found in Europe.

Taxonomy[edit]

Leopard frogs (meadow frogs) were often grouped with the American bullfrog and relatives in the genus Lithobates. Lithobates, however, is no longer recognized as a genus by most authors.[1][2][3]

Species[edit]

Further species may exist in this famous cryptic species complex

New species[edit]

In March 2012, it was announced that DNA testing had confirmed that a new species of leopard frog had been found whose habitat was centered near New York's Yankee Stadium[4] and included northern New Jersey, southeastern mainland New York, and Staten Island; the new still unnamed species is part of a cryptic species complex that was first distinguished by its short, repetitive croak, distinct from the "long snore" or "rapid chuckle" of other area leopard frog species. <This species has now been identified as far south as southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina.[5][6]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Hillis & Wilcox (2005)
  2. ^ Hillis (2007)
  3. ^ Pauly et al. (2009)
  4. ^ "New Frog Discovered in NYC: Freshwater Species of the Week – News Watch". Newswatch.nationalgeographic.com. 2012-03-16. Retrieved 2012-07-09. 
  5. ^ "Hiding in Plain Sight, a New Frog Species With a 'Weird' Croak Is Identified in New York City". ScienceDaily. March 14, 2012. Retrieved 2012-03-15. 
  6. ^ Newman CE, Feinberg JA, Rissler LJ, Burger J, Shaffer HR. 2012. A new species of leopard frog (Anura: Ranidae) from the urban northeastern US. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 63 (2): 445-455. ("Rana sp. nov.")

References[edit]

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Rana (genus)

"Brown frog" and "Pond frog" redirect here. For other uses, see Brown frog (disambiguation) and Pond frog (disambiguation).

Rana (commonly known as the pond frog or brown frog) is a genus of frogs. Members of this genus are found through much of Eurasia, North America, Africa, Central America, and the northern half of South America. Many other genera were formerly included here;[1] see below for details.

These true frogs are usually largish species characterized by their slim waists and wrinkled skin; many have thin ridges running along their backs but they generally lack "warts" like in typical toads. They are excellent jumpers due to their long slender legs. The typical webbing found on their hind feet allows for easy movement through water. Coloration is mostly greens and browns above, with darker and yellowish spots.

Distribution and habitat[edit]

Many frogs in this genus breed in early spring, although subtropical and tropical species may breed throughout the year. Males of most of the species are known to call, but a few species are thought to be voiceless. Females lay eggs in rafts or large, globular clusters, and can produce up to 20,000 at one time.

Diet[edit]

Rana species feed mainly on insects and invertebrates, but will swallow anything they can fit into their mouths, including small vertebrates. Among their predators are egrets, crocodiles and snakes.

Systematics[edit]

Some 50 species are now placed in this genus; many other species formerly placed in Rana are now placed elsewhere, for the North American frogs see Lithobates. Rana is now restricted to the Old World true frogs and the Eurasian brown and pond frogs of the common frog R. temporaria group.[2][3] The validity and delimitation of the subgenera are somewhat disputed.[4]

Genera recently split from Rana are Babina, Clinotarsus (including Nasirana), Glandirana, Hydrophylax, Hylarana, Lithobates, Odorrana (including Wurana), Pelophylax, Pulchrana, Sanguirana, and Sylvirana. Of these, Odorrana is so closely related to Rana proper, it could conceivably be included here once again. The others seem to be far more distant relatives, in particular Pelophylax.[1]

New species are still being described in some numbers.

Species[edit]

The harpist brown frog (also known as Kampira Falls frog or Yaeyama harpist frog) was formerly known as R. psaltes; it was subsequently identified as the long-known R. okinavana. The latter name has been misapplied to the Ryūkyū brown frog, but the harpist brown frog is a rather distinct species that apparently belongs in Babina or Nidirana if these are considered valid.[5]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Cai et al. (2007), Stuart (2008)
  2. ^ Lithobates, American Museum of Natural History.
  3. ^ Hillis & Wilcox (2005), Hillis (2007), Pauly et al. (2009)
  4. ^ Hillis & Wilcox (2005), Hillis (2007), Stuart (2008), Pauly et al. (2009)
  5. ^ Matsui (2007)

References[edit]

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