Overview

Brief Summary

North American Ecology (US and Canada)

Speyeria coronis is a resident in the northwestern United States (Scott 1986). Habitats are transition to Canadian zone chaparral, sagbrush and conifer woodland. Host plants are herbaceous, restricted to several species within genus Viola (Violaceae). Eggs are laid haphazardly, near the host plant, singly. Individuals overwinter as unfed first instar larvae. There is one flight each year with the approximate flight time June 1- early Sep. (Scott 1986).
  • Scott, J. A. 1986. The butterflies of North America. Stanford University Press.
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Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (>2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)) Washington and western South Dakota south to southern California, Arizona, Colorado. Discontinuous.

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Various: chaparral, sagelands, open pine forest, canyons, meadows. Hosts are in genus Viola. Opler (1999) also adds oak woodland.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

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Global Abundance

10,000 to >1,000,000 individuals

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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Adults sip flower nectar and occasionally mud. Males patrol for females (Scott, 1986).
  • Scott, J. A. 1986. The butterflies of North America. Stanford University Press.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Speyeria coronis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 13
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Widespread and common in west. Subspecies CORONIS and HERNEI somewhat restricted or in need of monitoring.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: D : Unthreatened throughout its range, communities may be threatened in minor portions of the range or degree of variation falls within natural variation

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Management

Global Protection: Many to very many (13 to >40) occurrences appropriately protected and managed

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Wikipedia

Speyeria coronis

The Coronis Fritillary (Speyeria coronis) is a butterfly of the Nymphalidae family of North America. It is common from Baja California to Washington and west to Colorado and western South Dakota and once reported in Alberta.[1][2]

This butterfly is mostly orange and yellow coloured with distinct dark-brown bars on the topside. The wing margins are dark with lighter circles then dark crescents. Silvery spots predominate on the yellowish underside.[1][3]

Wingspan ranges from 60–86 mm (2.4–3.4 in).[2]

Larva feed on Viola sp.[4]

Similar Species

Subspecies

Listed alphabetically.[4]

  • S. c. halcyone (Edwards, 1869)
  • S. c. hennei (Gunder, 1934)
  • S. c. semiramis (Edwards, 1886)
  • S. c. simaetha dos Passos & Grey, 1945
  • S. c. snyderi (Skinner, 1897)

References

  1. ^ a b c Coronis Fritillary, Butterflies of Canada
  2. ^ a b Coronis Fritillary, Butterflies and moths of North America
  3. ^ Jim P. Brock and K. Kaufman. Kaufman Field Guide to Butterflies of North America, New York, NY:Houghton Mifflin, 2003.
  4. ^ a b Speyeria, funet.fi
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