Overview

Brief Summary

North American Ecology (US and Canada)

Chlosyne nycteis is resident to the eastern United States and southeastern Canada, as well as a few isolated populations further west (Scott 1986). Habitats are streamsides, moist meadows, open moist deciduous woods. Host plants are herbaceous species restricted to family Compositae. Eggs are laid on the host plant in clusters averaging 121 eggs per clutch. Individuals overwinter as third instar larvae, in a special skin. There is a variable number of flights each year depending on latitude with one flight in the north and high altitude between June 1-July15, and multiple flights in the southern part of the range from Mar.1-Sept30. (Scott 1986).
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Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Habitats vary greatly in large part with foodplant in different parts of range, for example near a stream and in adjacent pitch pine barren in southern Maine, trap rock glades in ridgetop oak woodland in Connecticut but usually along streams in Canada. Mostly dry rocky ridgetop woodland or riparian areas through forests eastward. Can occur especially along paths or small streams in rather heavily shaded areas so forest checkoffs seem appropriate, but typically a woodland species.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Associations

Flowering Plants Visited by Chlosyne nycteis in Illinois

Chlosyne nycteis Doubleday & Hewitson: Nymphalidae, Lepidoptera
(one observation is from Graenicher, otherwise observations are from Robertson; this butterfly is the Silvery Checkerspot)

Acanthaceae: Justicia americana sn (Rb); Alismataceae: Sagittaria latifolia [stam sn] (Rb); Apiaceae: Eryngium yuccifolium sn (Rb), Heracleum maximum sn (Rb), Taenidia integerrima sn (Rb); Asteraceae: Aster pilosus sn (Rb), Bidens aristosa sn (Rb), Echinacea pallida sn (Rb), Echinacea purpurea sn (Rb), Eupatoriadelphus purpureus sn (Rb), Eupatorium altissimum sn (Rb), Helianthus divaricatus sn (Rb), Helianthus strumosus sn (Rb), Heliopsis helianthoides sn (Gr), Rudbeckia hirta sn (Rb), Rudbeckia laciniata sn (Rb), Rudbeckia subtomentosa sn (Rb), Rudbeckia triloba sn fq (Rb), Silphium perfoliatum sn (Rb); Boraginaceae: Lithospermum canescens sn (Rb); Brassicaceae: Capsella bursa-pastoris sn (Rb), Cardamine bulbosa sn (Rb); Caprifoliaceae: Viburnum prunifolium sn (Rb); Fabaceae: Trifolium hybridum sn np (Rb); Hydrophyllaceae: Hydrophyllum appendiculatum sn (Rb); Lamiaceae: Blephilia hirsuta sn (Rb), Pycnanthemum tenuifolium sn (Rb); Liliaceae: Camassia scilloides sn (Rb); Lythraceae: Lythrum alatum sn (Rb); Rosaceae: Rubus allegheniensis sn (Rb), Rubus flagellaris sn (Rb), Rubus occidentalis sn (Rb); Rubiaceae: Houstonia lanceolata sn fq (Rb); Valerianaceae: Valerianella radiata sn (Rb)

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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Adults feed on flower nectar and mud in the east. Males patrol for females (Scott, 1986).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Chlosyne nycteis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 4 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

TGAGCAGGTATAGTTGGAACATCTTTAAGACTTCTAATTCGAACTGAATTAGGAAATCCAGGATCTTTAATTGGAGAT---GATCAAATTTATAATACAATTGTTACAGCTCATGCTTTTATTATAATTTTTTTTATAGTTATACCTATTATAATTGGAGGATTTGGTAATTGATTAGTTCCCTTAATATTAGGAGCCCCAGATATAGCCTTTCCTCGAATAAATAATATAAGATTTTGACTATTACCCCCATCACTAATTCTCTTAATTTCTAGAAGAATTGTAGAAAATGGTGCAGGTACGGGATGAACAGTGTACCCCCCACTTTCTTCTAATATCGCCCATAGAGGATCATCCGTTGATTTAGCAATCTTCTCACTACATTTAGCGGGAATTTCATCAATTTTAGGAGCTATTAATTTTATTACAACAATTATCAATATACGAGTTAATAATATATCCTTTGATCAGATACCTTTATTTGTTTGAGCAGTAGGTATTACAGCTCTTTTATTATTATTATCATTACCTGTATTAGCTGGAGCTATTACCATACTTCTAACAGATCGAAATATTAATACATCATTTTTTGACCCTGCTGGTGGAGGTGACCCAATTTTATACCAACATTTATTTTGATTTTTTGGNNNNNNTGAAGTTTATATTTTAATTTTACCAGGATTTGGAATAATTTCTCATATTATCTCCCAAGAAAGAGGAAAAAAGGAAACTTTTGGTTGTTTAGGTATAATTTATGCTATAATAGCAATTGGTTTATTAGGATTTATTGTATGAGCTCACCACATATTTACTGTAGGAATAGACATTGATACTCGAG
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Chlosyne nycteis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 4
Specimens with Barcodes: 8
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Chlosyne nycteis

Common names
Silvery Checkerspot

The Silvery Checkerspot (Chlosyne nycteis) is a species of Nymphalinae that occurs in North America.

Description[edit]

Adult

The dorsal view is pale yellow-orange with dark borders and markings. The hindwing has a white centered submarginal spots on both sides, dorsal and ventral. The hindwing is pale and has a white crescent at the margin.

Caterpillar

The caterpillar is almost all black with dusted white spots. Sometimes they have a yellow-orange stripe or two smaller stripes along the side. The Nymphalidae family is known for its branched spines.

Range & Habitat[edit]

Their range consist of southern Canada south to Georgia and Texas, but does not occur in the Costal Plains. Silvery Checkerspots enjoy moist areas such as streamsides. They can also be seen in meadows and forest openings.

Life cycle[edit]

In the northern portion of its habitat there is one brood between June and July, for the remainder of its range there are two broods from May to September. There have often been recorded three broods in the deep southern part of Texas. Females lay eggs in batches which there can be up to 100 individuals. Early instar caterpillars stay in groups as they skeletonize leaves while the third-instar hibernates.

Larval foods[edit]

Adult foods[edit]

References[edit]

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: The name ismeria was suppressed by ICZN in 2006. Therefore it is a moot point whether it originally applied to this species as Gatrelle (2003) concluded or to C. gorgone as nearly every one else concluded. C. nycteis seems to form foodplant races in the east, e.g. a univoltine woodland Helianthus-feeding biotype is possibly a recently extinct (due to deer?) from Connecticut to northern New Jersey, wingstem-ffeding version in lowlands from southeast Pennsylvania to Georgia, unknown, but neither of these, in Maine. No such host races have been given taxonomic status and Gatrelle (2003) makes no attempt to evaluate foodplants of the various subspecies he recognizes based on wing maculation. While Gatrelle recognizes three subspecies in the east, one of which he names as new, without a more thorough review of overall variation south of about the Mason-Dixon line and Ohio River there seems no compelling reason to recognize eastern subspecies. If it holds up as a valid taxon, the southern lowland one that Gatrelle considers to be ismeria might possibly be of conservation concern.

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