Overview

Brief Summary

Gastrotheca is a genus of frogs (family Hemiphractidae) found in Central and South America.  The genus currently includes 68 recognized species.  Most species occur in the American Cordillera from southern Costa Rica to northwestern Argentina. This genus makes up the bulk of marsupial frog diversity; formerly it was placed in the "Leptodactylidae" assemblage.

Marsupial frogs are so-called because they possess a dorsal brood pouch. In some species the eggs are fertilized on the female's lower back, and are inserted in her pouch with the aid of the male's toes. The eggs remain in contact with the female's vascular tissue, which provides them oxygen.

Gastrotheca guentheri (Guenther's Marsupial Frog) is the only known frog with true teeth in its lower jaw.

Gastrotheca riobambae (Andean Marsupial Tree Frog) is kept as pet and is used in scientific experiments.

(Frost 2013; Duellman et al. 2011; Faivovich et al. 2005)

This article is from Wikipedia 2015.

  • Duellman, W.E., Catenazzi, A. & Blackburn, D.C. (2011): A new species of marsupial frog (Anura: Hemiphractidae: Gastrotheca) from the Andes of southern Peru. Zootaxa 3095: 1-14.
  • Faivovich, J., Haddad, C.F.B., Garcia, P.C.O., Frost, D.R., Campbell, J.A. & Wheeler, W.C. (2005): Systematic review of the frog family Hylidae, with special reference to Hylinae: Phylogenetic analysis and taxonomic revision. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History. 294: 1-240
  • Frost, Darrel R. (2013). "Gastrotheca Fitzinger, 1843". Amphibian Species of the World 5.6, an Online Reference. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 20 June 2013.
  • Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia, 24 June 2015. Gastrotheca. Retrieved August 1 2015 from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gastrotheca&oldid=668385397
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Comprehensive Description

Description

Gastrotheca abdita belongs to the Gastrotheca marsupiata complex, whose distribution north seems to be impeded by the Huancabamba Depression (ranges and basins of low relief in the Andes of northern Peru and extreme southern Ecuador). Max SVL reaches 35 mm in males, 46.2 in females. Head width is slightly greater than head length. Snout is acuminate when viewed dorsally and bluntly rounded/projecting beyond anterior border of snout in lateral view. Diameter of eye is about equal to eye-nostril distance. Tibia length is 49% SVL. Dorsal skin is smooth to weakly areolate. The first finger is equal in length to second finger. Webbing on foot is variable in length. Dark canthal stripe is absent, tympanum brown, and dorsum uniform brown (80%) or with narrow darker middorsal mark (20%). This species is direct developing. Fingers unwebbed and have a terminal disc whose diameter equals that of the tympanum. Relative length of fingers is 1=2<4<3; relative length of toes 1<2<3=5<4. Skin on flanks, belly, and proximal posteroventral surfaces of thighs granular. Anal opening is directed posteiorly at the upper level of thighs. The pouch opening is U-shaped, whose anterior border is at the level of the sacrum. In preservative, this species is dull grayish-brown with a darker brown middorsal stripe that begins at the occipital region, proceeds posteriorly, bifurcates posterior to scapula and coalesces anteriorly to its terminus at the anterior border of the pouch. Ventral coloration is tan (Duellman 1987).

  • Duellman, W. E. (1987). ''Two new species of marsupial frogs (Anura: Hylidae) from Peru.'' Copeia , 1987(4), 903-909.
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Distribution

Distribution and Habitat

Found in the higher western slopes of the Cordillera Colan in the Huancabamba Depression in northern Peru above treeline at elevations of 2970-3330 m. Females were found in grassy areas, in a bog, and in the frongs of a spiny terrestrial bromeliad.

  • Duellman, W. E. (1987). ''Two new species of marsupial frogs (Anura: Hylidae) from Peru.'' Copeia , 1987(4), 903-909.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:134
Specimens with Sequences:170
Specimens with Barcodes:61
Species:12
Species With Barcodes:10
Public Records:98
Public Species:2
Public BINs:4
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Barcode data

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Conservation

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Direct developers found in grassy areas. Not much is known of their behavior.

  • Duellman, W. E. (1987). ''Two new species of marsupial frogs (Anura: Hylidae) from Peru.'' Copeia , 1987(4), 903-909.
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