Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Ansonia endauensis is a small and slender toad. Males reach at least 17.4 mm in SVL, and females at least 28.5 mm in SVL. The head is the same width as the body. Both body and head are somewhat flattened. When viewed from above, the snout is square and projects past the lower jaw. The tip of the snout has a vertical ridge and is laterally constricted. There is no yellow wart at the angle of the jaw, unlike Ansonia malayana. Eyes are large. The tympana are distinct and vertically elliptical. Canthi are sharp and weakly constricted, and the lores are vertical. Neither cranial crests nor parotoids are present. The fingers are long and slender and unwebbed, with narrow, rounded tips. The first finger is shorter than the second finger. Toes are webbed with each toe having one or more phalanges projecting past the webbing; the third and fifth toes each have two phalanges free of the webbing. Both inner and outer metatarsal tubercles are present. There is neither a tarsal ridge nor an interorbital ridge.

Dorsally and laterally, the skin is tubercular, with small, rounded tubercles bearing a brown tip. The tubercles are not regularly arranged, with the exception of a single row of small spinose tubercles underneath the mandibles, and three rows of tubercles in the mental region. The abdominal skin is coarsely granular.

The dorsum is black and the ventrum is gray. This species has an orange spot below the eye, as well as orange spots on the side of the head and neck, and small orange spots on the flanks. Prominent orange bars are found on the upper and lower parts of the limbs. Light spotting is present on the belly as well as the underside of the hindlimbs, but there is no spotting in the gular region or on the underside of the forelimbs.

A. endauensis can be distinguished from all other species of Ansonia by dual vocal slits in the male (other Ansonia have only one vocal slit, on either the right or the left), and red irises (other Ansonia have golden-brown irises).

  • Grismer, L. L. (2006). ''A new species of Ansonia Stoliczka, 1870 (Anura: Bufonidae) from a lowland rainforest in southern peninsular Malaysia.'' Herpetologica, 62(4), 466-475.
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Distribution

Distribution and Habitat

Ansonia endauensis occurs in southern peninsular Malaysia. The initial species description is from the Endau-Rompin National Park. Since this species has only recently been described (Grismer 2006), the full extent of its distribution is not yet known. It appears to prefer rocky streams in closed-canopy lowland forest. The holotype was collected at 46 m in elevation.

  • Grismer, L. L. (2006). ''A new species of Ansonia Stoliczka, 1870 (Anura: Bufonidae) from a lowland rainforest in southern peninsular Malaysia.'' Herpetologica, 62(4), 466-475.
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Conservation

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

A. endauensis has been found perched on vegetation above a rocky stream, within a meter of the water's surface. This species has been observed only at night, subsequent to afternoon rains.

  • Grismer, L. L. (2006). ''A new species of Ansonia Stoliczka, 1870 (Anura: Bufonidae) from a lowland rainforest in southern peninsular Malaysia.'' Herpetologica, 62(4), 466-475.
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Wikipedia

Ansonia (genus)

Ansonia is a genus of true toads (stream toads) found in south India, northern Thailand, Malay Peninsula, Tioman Island, Borneo, and Mindanao (Philippines).[1] These small forest species spawn in streams and have torrent-adapted tadpoles.[2]

Species[edit]

There are currently 28 species in this genus:[1][3]

Binomial name and authorityCommon name
Ansonia albomaculata Inger, 1960whitebelly stream toad
Ansonia anotis Inger, Tan & Yambun, 2001
Ansonia echinata Inger & Stuebing, 2009
Ansonia endauensis Grismer, 2006Endau stream toad[4]
Ansonia fuliginea (Mocquard, 1890)North Borneo stream toad
Ansonia glandulosa (Iskandar & Mumpuni, 2004)
Ansonia guibei Inger, 1966Mesilau stream toad
Ansonia hanitschi Inger, 1960Kadamaian stream toad
Ansonia inthanon Matsui, Nabhitabhata & Panha, 1998Inthanon stream toad
Ansonia jeetsukumarani Wood, Grismer, Norhayati, and Senawi, 2008
Ansonia kraensis Matsui, Khonsue, & Nabhitabhata, 2005Kra stream toad[2]
Ansonia latidisca Inger, 1966Sambas stream toad
Ansonia latiffi Wood, Grismer, Norhayati, and Senawi, 2008
Ansonia latirostra Grismer, 2006
Ansonia leptopus (Günther, 1872)Matang stream toad
Ansonia longidigita Inger, 1960long-fingered stream toad
Ansonia lumut Chan, Wood, Anuar, Muin, Quah, Sumarli, and Grismer, 2014long-fingered stream toad
Ansonia malayana Inger, 1960pigmy false toad
Ansonia mcgregori (Taylor, 1922)McGregor's stream toad
Ansonia minuta Inger, 1960tiny stream toad
Ansonia muelleri (Boulenger, 1887)Muller's stream toad
Ansonia penangensis Stoliczka, 1870Penang stream toad
Ansonia platysoma (Inger, 1960Luidan stream toad
Ansonia siamensis Kiew, 1985Siamese stream toad
Ansonia spinulifer (Mocquard, 1890)Kina Balu stream toad
Ansonia thinthinae Wilkinson, Sellas, and Vindum, 2012
Ansonia tiomanica Hendrickson, 1966Pulo Tioman stream toad
Ansonia torrentis Dring, 1983Gunung Mulu stream toad
Ansonia vidua Hertwig, Min, Haas, and Das, 2014Pulo Tioman stream toad

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Frost, Darrel R. (2014). "Ansonia Stoliczka, 1870". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 7 September 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Matsui, M., W. Khonsue, and J. Nabhitabhata (2005). "A new Ansonia from the Isthmus of Kra, Thailand (Amphibia, Anura, Bufonidae)". Zoological Science 22: 809–814. doi:10.2108/zsj.22.809. 
  3. ^ "Bufonidae". AmphibiaWeb: Information on amphibian biology and conservation. [web application]. Berkeley, California: AmphibiaWeb. 2014. Retrieved 7 September 2014. 
  4. ^ L Lee Grismer, 2006: A new species of Ansonia Stoliczka, 1870 (Anura: Bufonidae) from a lowland rainforest in Southern Peninsular Malaysia. Herpetologica 62,4: pp. 466–475 [1]
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