Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Subfamily Carcininae
  • Crosnier, A. (1962). Faune de Madagascar. XVI Crustaces Decapodes: Portunidae.
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 1777 specimens in 3 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 63 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): -3 - 113
  Temperature range (°C): 8.938 - 12.348
  Nitrate (umol/L): 2.283 - 16.868
  Salinity (PPS): 22.343 - 35.363
  Oxygen (ml/l): 6.069 - 7.118
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.312 - 0.890
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.147 - 11.419

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): -3 - 113

Temperature range (°C): 8.938 - 12.348

Nitrate (umol/L): 2.283 - 16.868

Salinity (PPS): 22.343 - 35.363

Oxygen (ml/l): 6.069 - 7.118

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.312 - 0.890

Silicate (umol/l): 2.147 - 11.419
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Associations

Known predators

Carcinus is prey of:
Aves
Somateria
Arenaria interpres
Laridae
Tautogolabrus
Actinopterygii
Mammalia

Based on studies in:
Ireland (River)
USA: Maine, Gulf of Maine (Littoral, Rocky shore)
Scotland, Ythan estuary (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • D. C. Edwards, D. O. Conover, F. Sutter, Mobile predators and the structure of marine intertidal communities, Ecology 63(4):1175-1180, from p. 1178 (1982).
  • H. Milne and G. M. Dunnet, Standing crop, productivity and trophic relations of the fauna of the Ythan estuary. In: The Estuarine Environment, R. S. K. Barnes and J. Green, Eds. (Applied Science Publications, Edinburgh, Scotland, 1972), pp. 86-106, from
  • J. A. Kitching and F. J. Ebling, Ecological studies at Lough Ine, Adv. Ecol. Res. 4:197-291, from p. 288 (1967).
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Known prey organisms

Carcinus preys on:
Paracentrotus
detritus
Mytilus
Balanus
Littorina
Thais

Based on studies in:
Ireland (River)
Scotland, Ythan estuary (Estuarine)
USA: Maine, Gulf of Maine (Littoral, Rocky shore)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • D. C. Edwards, D. O. Conover, F. Sutter, Mobile predators and the structure of marine intertidal communities, Ecology 63(4):1175-1180, from p. 1178 (1982).
  • H. Milne and G. M. Dunnet, Standing crop, productivity and trophic relations of the fauna of the Ythan estuary. In: The Estuarine Environment, R. S. K. Barnes and J. Green, Eds. (Applied Science Publications, Edinburgh, Scotland, 1972), pp. 86-106, from
  • J. A. Kitching and F. J. Ebling, Ecological studies at Lough Ine, Adv. Ecol. Res. 4:197-291, from p. 288 (1967).
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:384
Specimens with Sequences:356
Specimens with Barcodes:259
Species:2
Species With Barcodes:2
Public Records:305
Public Species:2
Public BINs:3
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Carcinus

Carcinus (Greek: Καρκίνος Karkinos) is a genus of crabs, which includes Carcinus maenas, an important invasive species, and C. aestuarii, a species endemic to the Mediterranean Sea.[1]

Carcinus maenas[edit source | edit]

Carcinus maenas is among the 100 "world's worst alien invasive species". It is native to the north-east Atlantic Ocean and Baltic Sea, but has colonised similar habitats in Australia, South Africa, South America and both Atlantic and Pacific coasts of North America. It grows to a carapace width of 90 millimetres (3.5 in), and feeds on a variety of molluscs, worms and small crustaceans, potentially impacting a number of fisheries. Its successful dispersion has occurred via a variety of mechanisms, such as on ships' hulls, packing materials, bivalves moved for aquaculture, and rafting.

C. maenas is known by different names around the world. In the British Isles, it is generally referred to simply as the shore crab. In North America and South Africa, it bears the name green crab or European green crab. In Australia and New Zealand, it is referred to as either the European green crab or European shore crab.

Carcinus aestuarii[edit source | edit]

Carcinus aestuarii is a native to the Mediterranean Sea. It is very similar to C. maenas, and is sometimes considered to be a subspecies of C. maenas rather than a species in its own right. The two taxa can be distinguished by the front of the carapace, between the eyes, which is short and toothed in C. maenas, but longer and smoother in C. aestuarii. Unlike C. maenas, C. aestuarii has only been implicated in one invasion; the coastline of Japan has been invaded by either C. aestuarii or a hybrid of C. aestuarii and C. maenas.

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ a b Peter K. L. Ng, Danièle Guinot & Peter J. F. Davie (2008). "Systema Brachyurorum: Part I. An annotated checklist of extant Brachyuran crabs of the world" (PDF). Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 17: 1–286. 
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