Overview

Brief Summary

The genus Periclimenes, also called anemone shrimps, includes about 175 species, many of which have obligate associations with other, often larger species, but some that are free-living.  They live in warm waters, and are especially diverse in reefs of the Indo-West Pacific.  Species that Periclimenes shrimp associate with frequently include sea anemones, but they also associate with corals, sponges, crinoids, sea stars, sea cucumbers, urchins, feather stars (crinoids) and sea slugs (nudibranchs).  The shrimp gain protection and/or transportation from their host and often keep their hosts’ surfaces clean by eating parasites and dead cells.  Some also eat small particles that get stirred up by their host, or eat tentacles or other portions of the host itself.  Some species set up “cleaning stations” and leave their host to remove parasites from fish, advertising with stereotypic movements of their long antennae to signal when fish can use their services.  These shrimp can be found in the mouths and gills of large fish such as moray eels and groupers. 

Anemone shrimps are variously colored, some with bright coloration, some clear or with camouflage coloration that match the species they live with.  Many of the hosts are noxious, poisonous, or have stinging tentacles, deterring predators for the shrimp as well as themselves.  Some Periclimenes shrimp do well in the aquarium trade, especially those that live on hosts that are easily cultured in tanks.

(Bruce 2004; De Grave and Türkay 2011; Foord 2008; Wikipedia 2013)

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 574 specimens in 116 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 242 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0.5 - 1206.5
  Temperature range (°C): 3.887 - 28.954
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.064 - 34.859
  Salinity (PPS): 32.616 - 37.151
  Oxygen (ml/l): 1.996 - 5.364
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.052 - 2.522
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.667 - 75.522

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0.5 - 1206.5

Temperature range (°C): 3.887 - 28.954

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.064 - 34.859

Salinity (PPS): 32.616 - 37.151

Oxygen (ml/l): 1.996 - 5.364

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.052 - 2.522

Silicate (umol/l): 0.667 - 75.522
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 320
Specimens with Sequences: 285
Specimens with Barcodes: 280
Species: 17
Species With Barcodes: 14
Public Records: 246
Public Species: 8
Public BINs: 10
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Barcode data

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Genomic DNA is available from 1 specimen with morphological vouchers housed at Queensland Museum
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Genomic DNA is available from 4 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at Museum of Tropical Queensland
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Wikipedia

Periclimenes

The genus Periclimenes contains a large number of species of shrimp that live symbiotically with larger animals, most commonly sea anemones, although some corals, sea stars, sea cucumbers. In the case of the imperial shrimp, P. imperator, the Spanish dancer sea slug, Hexabranchus sanguineus, is often the preferred host.[3]

The genus contains the following species:[4]



References[edit]

  1. ^ "Periclimenes Costa, 1844". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved February 11, 2011. 
  2. ^ I. N. Marin & Tin-Yam Chan (2006). "Two new genera and a new species of crinoid-associated pontoniine shrimps (Decapoda: Caridea: Palaemonidae)" (PDF). Journal of Crustacean Biology 26 (4): 524–539. doi:10.1651/S-2705.1. 
  3. ^ "Indo-Pacific Periclimines Shrimp (An Overview)". 
  4. ^ Sammy De Grave & Michael Türkay (2011). "Periclimenes Costa, O.G., 1844a". World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved February 11, 2011. 
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